Common Injuries/ Treatments for Athletes

It’s Friday night, and you are ready to hit the ice. You line up for the puck drop, it hits the ice and you skate straight for it. You grab the puck and head down the ice. Only one defenseman between you and the net. You deke to the left and you deke to the right, but when go to the right your blade catches a groove in the ice. You are thrown straight to your face. When you get up you can’t put any weight on your right foot. This is commonly known as an ankle sprain. If you are an athlete you put yourself at risk for all kinds of injuries, luckily there are tons of treatments you can do at home to get you back in the game in no time.


Ankle Sprain

What is it?

Ankle sprains are when the ligaments on the outside of your ankle stretch or tear. These ligaments in your ankle are very weak and easy to injure.

How to treat it?

To treat a sprain you have to keep stretching and exercising the area to help strengthen the ligaments. If the sprain happens higher up on your ankle and doesn’t heal in 3–4 days then you should see a doctor to make sure the bones didn’t separate. To prevent the sprain from happening in the first place the best prevention is plenty of stretching before your activity. You can also get an ankle brace to keep your ankle straight and keep it from stretching too far. We recommend the Venum Kontact Ankle Support.

Shin Splints

What is it?

Pain down the front of the shin is most commonly shin splints. You usually get them from running and if you start a new strenuous training program such as long runs on paved roads.

How to treat it?

The best way to treat shin splints are with rest and ice. You can also take over the counter medications such as Tylenol or Advil. If the pain persists for a week or longer then you should see a doctor to make sure it isn’t actually a stress fracture in your shin. To prevent a shin splint you should build your running program up gradually and take days off from running so you don’t strain your shins. When running take shorter strides, and make sure you strike mid-foot. You can also buy Orthotic insoles such as the Orsippus Performance Insoles.

Groin Pull

What is it?

The groin is the muscle from the upper-inner thigh to the inner thigh right above your knee. Your groin is often injured from quick side to side movements. Hockey, soccer, football, and baseball players commonly have groin injuries.

How to treat it?

Compression, rest, and ice will heal most groin injuries. If you don’t rest long enough then you can re-aggravate it and turn it into a long term problem. If your groin is very swollen then you will need to see a doctor to be diagnosed. The best way to prevent a groin injury is to stretch your groin properly before working out.

Hamstring Strains

What is it?

The hamstring is the large muscle on the back of your thigh. Poor stretching techniques or a lack of stretching can be the cause of your hamstring strains. Often if you tear your hamstring then the back of your leg will be bruised.

How to treat it?

Hamstring injuries are slow to heal because of the constant stress while walking. The best thing to do for a hamstring injury is to ice it and lots of rest. It can take six to twelve months for it to fully heal.

Tennis Elbow

What is it?

Tennis elbow is usually seen with athletes who have to do a lot of gripping activities. You can get Tennis elbow from other sports besides tennis, such as Hockey and Golf. It is an overuse injury from the repetitive action. The tendons in the forearm inflame and make any hand or wrist movements extremely painful

How to treat it?

Early treatment involves rest and icing until you can see a doctor. The doctor will generally prescribe anti-inflammatories and also recommend a wrist brace to keep the movement limited. We would recommend the Copper Joint Wrist Support.

When you are an athlete in any sport injuries are bound to happen. It’s the price you pay to play the game. The most common injuries though are simple to treat and can be prevented with braces and proper stretching!