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In 2014, Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook was killing off its credo, move fast and break things.

“We used to have this mantra, ‘Move fast and break things,’” said CEO Mark Zuckerberg during his keynote. “We were willing to tolerate a few bugs to [move fast]. But having to slow down and fix things was slowing us down. ‘Move fast with stable infra[structure]’ isn’t as catchy, but it helps us build better for the people we serve.”

Facebook found, like many companies that, when sustainable growth is the goal, speed is counterproductive. In fact, retrofitting a product in market with feature sets and functionality that it should have had in the first place is expensive, costing far more time and money than originally intended. …


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Differentiation is a buzzy word. It’s a word that is used synonymously with unique. When applied to the marketplace, everyone….and I do mean everyone, is looking for that thing that separates them from their competitors. Competitive marketplaces today are less defined and connectivity opens up your marketplace competitors to include tangential services making differentiation imperative for growth.

But…how do you know when you’ve hit differentiation? And which data gives you insight into what differentiates you?

First, you must define what differentiation is not. Here’s a hint: it’s not cool stuff or flashy feature sets. Differentiators are defined by what’s commonplace in the market your brand lives in. …


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In today’s marketplace I frequently hear (and have been heard saying myself) that today’s consumer isn’t brand loyal. As an industry, there’s a lot of commentary around the idea that brand loyalty reminiscent of Mad Men days is a sentiment of yesteryear and loyalty is hard to capture, harder to keep, and easier to lose. And, there is truth in this reflection.

Consumers today come to the table with high expectations of experience. Connectivity amplifies competitive markets, encouraging consumer feedback and opinion. There are no dark corners of illusions for companies to hide in, they either deliver a great experience or they don’t. Either way, the world hears about it. Companies feel the pressure to deliver an experience that creates a deep connection and drives engagement. …


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We can all (at least on a logical level) agree that data plays a role in product design. However, the idea of incorporating research into a design process is one that, often times, feels rigid and somewhat oppositional to the creative process. At first glance, the upfront investment in research is wasting precious time and money that should be spent on product development.

Yet, when we take a step back and look at the larger picture, we begin to understand that business objectives, research, and design are inextricably linked and all very necessary for success:

→ Products and services exist for the purpose of moving the needle on business objectives and goals. Products don’t exist for the sake of having a product, at least the good ones don’t. …


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Today’s world is increasingly connected, with both consumers and products creating waves of new data, digital footprints, and new behavior. Across industries, utilizing data driven insights to create new revenue streams and drive market disruption has become more about brand survival than nuance.

To complicate even further, the hyper-connectivity has blurred traditional business boundaries, expanding competitive sets to include non-traditional adversaries and adjacent industries. There is an urgency to ensure your position in the marketplace is well-targeted and every industry is feeling it.

Using data to understand and connect with target consumer markets is one way to drive disruption in consumer products and forge brand survival. Despite the pressing need for effectively using data to drive innovations, few businesses have done so successfully. …


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Engagement is one of those metrics that seem to change meaning depending on what you are measuring and what type of product users are engaging. For websites, engagement may mean conversions or time spent interacting with your content. For mobile products, it may be use frequency or behavior while using the product. For Netflix, viewing a huge part of their secret sauce. But, in all cases, engagement is the way someone interacts with your product.

It’s Worth Doing Right caught up with Steven Gianakouros a Design Manager on the Creative Product Team at Netflix to understand engagement and design. If you haven’t listened, you should. …


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graphic credit: Accomplice

Internal disconnects within your organization always show up in your end user experience..always, without exception. This talk unpacks common cultural issues and how they manifest in your end UX , originally presented on the stage at 2018 SXSW Interactive with my beloved friend, Olivia King Hayes (she did amazing, I thought I was going to pass out).

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Leah: Hi, friends. We are so glad you guys are here. It’s a full house. A few house keeping before we start. Our hashtag for today’s talk is #exposedux. You can find us on Twitter, or Instagram, or wherever else the cool kids are hanging out online. Olivia and I will jump on those channels after the talk, and we’ll be happy to answer questions then. So without much ado, let’s get started. My name’s Leah Hacker. I am Head of Research for Accomplice. And this is my friend and colleague, Olivia Hayes, Head of Product Strategy at Accomplice. …

About

Leah Hacker

CEO & Founder of Rebel & Co. | Researcher & Strategist

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