New Year’s ‘’resolutions”, the real hangover you wake up with.

Yes, we’ve all been there. A beating heart race, the powerlessness to look at any reflecting object without wanting to scream or curse at yourself. Failing a resolution on the first day from our micro list of a bullet journal can be unforgivable, particularly the one that expects you to begin on the first of January. It’s absurd to feel you ought to have trimmed down your expectations and objectives of New Year just by flopping on the principal day of the year.

If you’re getting yourself ready for your New Year’s resolutions extravaganza, keep these things in mind to avoid waking up in the days of January, ready to resolve yourself to give up your dream entirely.

Before anything else, acknowledge and possess it. We lived through the merrymaking of the holidays by shopping splurge and bingeing on the food. It is practically about a week apart to make life-changing decisions. It’s a small time frame for the majority of us to stick to new habits. In general statistics for the new year, only 8 percent able to keep up until the end of the year. While January 1st signifies a new beginning, each day is a new beginning for life itself. Hence it is a reset button. When resolutions are too ambitious, we struggle to change our habits, become discouraged when we fail and ultimately give up altogether.

5 ways you can re-align your resolutions.

  • It is easier to live intentionally by re-writing your goal in a counter effect manner. Instead of ‘I would like to be Vegan in 2018’, you could write ‘I’m going to stop consuming animal products starting January’. Understanding things you shouldn’t do or not suppose to do will psychologically guard your goals.
  • Your resolution results are based on a process that takes some time, which is chained to chunks of actions connecting to the end results. The process shouldn’t stop if you failed in your first action. It’s more rewarding when you can double your actions leading to your goal in the following days. This action pushes you to believe in your own strength. If you did not manage to exercise on the first day increase your sets of workout or prolong your work out time in the following day.
  • Understand the journey you are embarking is for your own benefit, and it shouldn’t have any hooks or clings to another person’s actions or co-commitment. Your resolutions should be about you that brings the best for your own mind, body and soul. If you made resolutions as a couple to save money or to eat healthy the actions in your resolutions should specifically be yours. If your better half didn’t manage to commit to something, your failing determination shall not fail to achieve the ultimate goal.
  • While it is handy to talk about your goals with few people that can uplift your journey. Bear in mind, to everyone’s interpretation of your goal can reflect differently. If you planning to save money this year merely to have extra cash later, your prudent lifestyle can mean differently to different people. Assumptions can arise and this may also affect you in a way when you need to explain why. Remember the journey is yours, friends, family, co-workers can take a ride with you but the end destination should be where you intended to be.
  • New Year’s day is not the only day in a year for you to chart your plans and goals. There is always every other day you can custom your resolutions to your lifestyle. Students can begin their resolutions when the semester begins. We can even make resolutions in the beginning of the season -say, spring. Indeed it is a good time for outdoor work-out, home improvements and etc. In fact, the best resolution date should be on your birthday. You plan according to your own biological clock. It will be more sensible, to write in your journal ‘I’m buying a house by the age of 32' or ‘finishing my degree by the age of 28’.

This life is yours, live it!. Imagining the bad results of the determination just serves to decrease your delight in your objective accomplishing process and consciousness of the present.

When you find yourself getting to be noticeably restless, ask yourself, ‘Am I really living for me?’ Instead of living blandly on Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat, get out and share your involvement with genuine individuals. Try not to make your new years resolutions as the lustrous post to impress your number friends or followers on social media. Learn something, teach something with people around you. The free world has no particular agenda, sustainability of happiness relies on the notion of “Live and Let Live”.

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Likes to remind himself to be a better person~Wants people to teach, inspire and grow mankind~Looking forward to just Live and Let Live.

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Hendra

Hendra

Likes to remind himself to be a better person~Wants people to teach, inspire and grow mankind~Looking forward to just Live and Let Live.

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