The Making of HoloCenter’s Latest Exhibition and Accompanying Audio Guide

Combining visual art, audio storytelling, and text-based transcripts for a more accessible exhibition experience, IRL or remote.

Museum visitors standing in front of a blue neon light installation in the Plaxall Gallery in Long Island City, New York.
BLISSVILLE by Kamari Carter & Julian Day, installation in EDGE OF LIGHT, 2020.

“Art has the capacity to continuously expand its audience, the number of people that it’s speaking to and the amount of people that it’s looking to really engage. Whatever we can do to find avenues to make that more accessible, the better off we are.”

–Jonathan Sims, Artist & Curator

3D glasses held up in front of a piece of light artwork that becomes a stereoscopic image, part of EDGE OF LIGHT exhibition.
NNAATTUURRAA MMOORRTTAA by Nicholas Steindorf and Kyle Williams (Blinn & Lambert), installation in EDGE OF LIGHT, 2020.
Light art from EDGE OF LIGHT. The installation looks to nature as a means to express humanity’s interconnectedness.
Light art from EDGE OF LIGHT. The installation looks to nature as a means to express humanity’s interconnectedness.
ANCIENT VOICES by Shohei Katayama, installation in EDGE OF LIGHT, 2020.
Installation with laser cut Fresnel lenses and video of the artist’s skin examined under the scanning electron microscope.
Installation with laser cut Fresnel lenses and video of the artist’s skin examined under the scanning electron microscope.
Borderlands by Jess Holz, installation in EDGE OF LIGHT, 2020.
Red neon lights in the form of trees, part of the exhibition EDGE OF LIGHT. Inspired by recent forest fires & climate change.
Red neon lights in the form of trees, part of the exhibition EDGE OF LIGHT. Inspired by recent forest fires & climate change.
FOREST FIRE by Emma Hendry, installation in EDGE OF LIGHT, 2020.

Co-founder of Gesso, maker of audio walks through cities + museums. Follow for latest insights on audio, museum tech, travel, culture, and more. www.gesso.app