A Superhero’s Letters to his Wife

May 30th, 2015

Brinda,
I finally returned home from the Dr. Mathur’s Lab. Three days of observation and testing is maddening I tell you. You know Dr. M’s Cancer Diagnosis lab in Santa Cruz where we took you? Turns out the lab is a front for Advanced Cancer Diagnosis but he keeps quite a lot of unusual testing machines there. Dr. M used to be a researcher in covert Military Research Ops where they studied and modified old WW2 German chemicals. Quite unimaginable of a slow, five and half feet old man. His lab has an extended area where he keeps his real test tubes. It is a simple square-footage illusion. I was really impressed how he managed to hide it. Huge CT scanners, Brain monitoring equipment and something that looked like a torture chair were all too frightening for me. When I first entered, it all started feeling like a very bad idea to agree to do this. Dr. M has a friend Rudra Vatz — who is an Electrical Engineering researcher at the MU. He barely talked. .

Even after a long series of tests they are still unable to determine the exact nature of my power. On the first day they took my blood samples and tested them. It turned out the plasma content in my blood is more than normal. but other than that, it’s just ‘regular’. All Body fluids took their turn one by one under the microscope doing not much help. One interesting thing we found on the second day was when Vatz was administering electrical pulses in my spine — while Dr. M tried to extract my blood, the needle bent. My skin hardened as an effect of those electrical pulses. You should have seen our faces. A new idea sprang in Dr. M’s head. They stopped the electricity for a while and he forced the needle in my arm. Starting the EP again, he extracted my blood. It was the darkest shade of red I’ve ever seen. But something even more peculiar there was to be noticed. On looking closely my blood showed little blue streaks like some kind of electrical discharge within it. It was amazing. Day two was quite a run. We did tests without any inhibitions. They were too confident now that I was in fact a ‘Super-Human’. They did pressure tests while I was plugged into the brain scanners. When under pressure, my brain works 50 times as fast as an average human being. Personally, I didn’t feel any smarter. They took about half a litre of my blood for storage and study. Plus my hair and skin sample; now there’s a questionable, perfectly square scar on my thigh. Day Three was a movie fest. They put me on a brain activity monitor and showed me movies, and news and documentaries.

On the third day Dr. M concluded that the incident didn’t give me any powers. I already had them. They might have simply been triggered that night. When the explosion took place, the shock wave must have activated my powers like super strength and hardening my skin — that’s the reason why I had no scratches even though most of my clothes were reduced to ashes. I remember being still standing when the explosion had faded away. Amidst the flames and smoke I remember I saw people dying; burnt and covered in shrapnel punctures. When the adrenaline wore off, I fainted.

Tell me something. Is it unnatural for someone like me to be excited about this? The explosion was a terrible thing to happen. I should be frightened. But I’m not. It is like someone put my life in gear and I honestly like this pace. Since you have been gone, I have had no goals in life. All I was doing was living for Ruva. Her school, practices and projects were all that ran in my head. After she started college I’ve started feeling quite lonely. This is something that’s made me feel special in so many years. If you can somehow, tell me if this is decent? or is it inappropriate?

And about Ruva.. She’s doing good. Sent her back to college last week just after I wrote to you. She didn’t want to leave me after the incident. It was quite a long discussion to convince her to go. She calls me Superman now. I think that’s every father’s dream. But in my case that’s actually quite literal. We’ve made a deal to not let anyone know of this. It was her idea. She also wanted to go somewhere far away to test if I could fly as well. ‘That’d be so cool’ is what she remarks. Got her to calm down after constant denial. She’s my exact opposite — like you. When she got on the train she said, ‘You’re going to need a new name.. and a Mask. I better see one when I come back.’ I discarded it with a smile. She’s still young, I thought, still believing all the good fantasies will come true. Now I am starting to realize her point. If I ever need to go out as whatever it is that I am, I will need a new name, a new face. I’m still undecided.

I’ll write to you soon. I Love you.

Yours,
Abhinav