Is Zero downtime even possible on RDS?

amazon rds mysql

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Oh RDS, you offer such promise, but damn it if the devil isn’t always buried in the details.


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Diving into a recent project, I’ve been looking at upgrading RDS MySQL. Major MySQL upgrades can be a bit messy. Since the entire engine is rebuilt, queries performance can change, syntax can break, and surely triggers & stored procedures can have problems.

That’s not even getting into it with storage engines. Still have some tables on MyISAM? Beware.

The conclusion I would make is if you want zero downtime, or even nearly zero, you’re going to want to roll your own MySQL on EC2 instances.

Read: Why high availability is so very hard to deliver

1. How long did that upgrade take?

First thing I set out to do was upgrade a test instance. One of the first questions my client asked, how long did that take? “Ummm… you know I can’t tell you clearly.” For an engineer this is the worst feeling. We live & die by finding answers. When your hands are tied, you really can’t say what’s going on behind the curtain.

While I’m sitting at the web dashboard, I feel like I’m trying to pickup a needle with thick leather gloves. Nothing to grasp here. At one point the dashboard was still spinning, and I was curious what was happening. I logged out and back in again, and found the entire upgrade step had already completed. I think that added five minutes to perceived downtime.

Sure I can look at the RDS instance log, and tell you when RDS logged various events. But when did the machine go offline, and when did it return for users? That’s a harder question to answer.

Without command line, I can’t monitor the process carefully, and minimize downtime. I can only give you a broad brush idea of what’s happening.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 use cases

2. Did we need to restart the instance?

RDS insists on rebooting the instance itself, everytime it performs a “Modify” operations. Often restarting the MySQL process would have been enough! This is like hunting squirrels with a bazooka. Definitely overkill.

As a DBA, it’s frustrating to watch the minutes spin by while your hands are tied. At some point I’m starting to wonder… Why am I even here?

Related: Howto automate MySQL slow query analysis with Amazon RDS

3. EBS Snapshots are blunt instruments

RDS provides some protection against a failed upgrade. The process will automatically snapshot your volume before it begins. That’s great. If I spend

See also: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage

4. Even promoting a read-replica sucks

I also evaluated using a read-replica. Here you spinup a slave first. You then upgrade *THAT* box to 5.6 ahead of your master. While your master is still sending data to the slave, your downtime would in theory be very minimal. Put master in read-only mode, wait few seconds for slave to catchup and switch application to point to slave, then promote it!

All that would work well with command line, as your instances don’t restart. But with RDS, it takes over seven long minutes!

Read this: 5 Reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

5. RDS can upgrade to MySQL 5.6!

MySQL 5.6 introduced a new timestamp datatype which allows for fractional seconds. Great feature, but it means the on-disk datastructures are different. Uh oh!

If you’re doing replication with MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 it will break because the rows will flow out in one size, and break the 5.6 formatted datafiles! Not good.

The solution requires running ALTER commands run on the master beforehand. That in turn locks up tables. So it turns out promoting a read-replica is a non-starter for 5.5 to 5.6. Doesn’t really save much.

All of this devil in the details stuff is terrible when you don’t have command line access.

Read: Are SQL databases dead?

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Originally published at Scalable Startups.