Starting a new career after 50

Credit AnnaVital

Many people believe once they pass a certain age, that their career options are limited. Most of us get stuck in one career, believing it’s too late to change our minds, even if our heart is begging us for a chance of direction. And when it comes to opportunities and life options, we often refer to the young, praising them and informing them of their potential, often forgetting our own great potential. But it’s never too late to start doing what you truly want to do. Age does not diminish the brightness of your future. As Mark Twain said, “age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

It’s never too late!

Starting a new career after 50 or advancing a new career after 50 are possibilities which are neither impossible nor unreasonable. In fact, many successful people around the world didn’t get their start until later in life. Here are some inspirations:

-Harland Sanders: If you’re an American worth your salt (or just one who likes it), you’ve probably eaten at Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) or at least heard of it at some point in your life. The owner, Harland Sanders, didn’t become the king of chicken until he was 65. Granted, he wasn’t too bad off as a younger man. In fact, he had his own restaurant. But when Interstate 75 opened seven miles from his restaurant, his business suffered. But rather than lose hope, Sanders was determined to come out on top, so he got to work on perfecting his spice-blend and fried chicken cooking technique. He then toured the country selling KFC franchises, and by the time he sold his business in 1964, there were over 900 franchises nationwide.

-Tim and Nina Zagat: You’ve probably referenced a Zagat guide for help in picking a restaurant, or have had your selection affirmed by a “Zagat-rated” sticker in a restaurant’s window. The husband-and-wife team behind the popular dining surveys of the same name were corporate lawyers when they first started printing their restaurant guides. The guides soon soared to popularity, and Tim, at 51 years old, left his job to manage the business full-time. His wife eventually left the corporate world to join him. In 2011, the couple sold Zagat to Google for $151 million.

-Takichiro Mori: Takichiro Mori, who was at one time the richest man in the world, didn’t start amassing his wealth until he left academia at age 55 to become a real estate investor in 1959. He soon became Japan’s real estate mogul, and when he died in 1993, it was with a net worth of around $13 billion.

-Charles Darwin: Darwin spent most of his life in obscurity, quietly researching nature. But at age 50, he published his “On the Origin of Species,” which changed the scientific community forever.

-Ray Croc: Another fast-food legend, Kroc was 50 before he bought his first McDonald’s in 1961, which he expanded into the biggest fast food chain in the world.

As you can see, not a one of these successful was a spring chicken. And yet, each one managed to turn their life around and find riches, success, and, ultimately, greater happiness — all because they didn’t let age stop them. Don’t let fear over a number prevent you from achieving your aspirations.

Start or advance your career after 50 today!

As legendary artist, Pablo Picasso put it, “we don’t grow older, we grow riper.” Don’t wait another moment to start your dream career. As a job seeker over 50, you have the advantage of well-honed skills and years of experience. Your only problem is competition. But what if you could cut out the competition and get your resume to the people who want to see it most? Let iEmployed help you get started on the path to your dream job. iEmployed will send your resume directly to the hiring managers of any three companies you select, giving you the highest chances of getting hired. Plus, iEmployed will help you with every part of the process: from interview tips to job offer negotiation advice.

Go to www.iemployed.com to start or advance your career!

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