In 2014 I reached my heaviest weight topping off at 190 lbs standing 5'2" tall. Depression and mindless eating lead me there, but I wasn’t inclined to stay very long. By the summer of 2015, I lost 50 pounds, and I felt great. That’s when I decided to pivot careers and get my personal training license. And even though I fell into fitness later in life, the truth is, sports played a significant role in my life growing up as a kid and continued well into high school. From the moment I picked up that first orange sphere, I was hooked on basketball and convinced myself I would one day be the first woman to play in the NBA. (I grew up in a time when the WNBA didn’t yet exist.) I always excelled in sports. I was the fastest girl in my elementary school, the girl picked first when assembling kickball teams, and I was even voted most athletic alongside my male counterpoint Brian. It comes as no surprise that getting in shape was a natural path for me. …


I had a friend who always used to say to me, “you live a TV show life.” It was the most bizarre… compliment? Girl, I guess. But I knew what she meant by it. I was mostly a living embodiment of The Cosby Show. The lovely house, with the nice parents, we went on a family vacation every year, and ate dinner together every night, and went to church every Sunday. We were the suburban family you see on TV, and for those who didn’t have this type of family life, it seemed like some corny unrealistic show that doesn’t exist in real life. But it did. We did. I remember this friend texting me asking what I was doing one summer afternoon, and I replied, sitting on the porch reading the paper with my parents. “That’s that TV life,” she joked. And she was right. Our home life was always picturesque, and I had the privilege of everything going right for me growing up as a kid. Maybe there were a few slight snafus, but much like the 25 minute Brady Bunch resolution that existed on sitcoms, trouble never really came to stay. …


My friend Ramy and I like to talk about sports a lot. We’re often interested in the same kind of sports, so we sometimes find ourselves going back and forth about everything that’s going on in the world of basketball and tennis. One day, we were texting each other during the men’s Wimbledon final, and after it was over, he said, I hate the way you root for sports. I was taken aback at first, but quickly understood what he meant. You see, when the match first started, we decided who we were going to root for that day. But as a fan of women’s tennis instead of men’s, I had no dog in the fight, and my loyalties wavered with almost every point. When it was down to the wire, it didn’t look as though the player we picked to win at the beginning would prevail, so I found myself rooting for the opponent once it became apparent he would clinch victory. I do that sometimes. Admittedly, it’s not an admirable trait, but I’m not ashamed to confess that I’m a proud bandwagon fan, and this tradition started in my youth. I grew up in the ’90s during the golden era of basketball. The game was reaching a critical mass fueled by the excitement over the greatest player the world had ever seen: Michael Jordan.

About

Kelly*Jones

Kelly*Jones, First of her name, Craftsmen of words & melodies, Soul Revolutionary, Protector of the Fitness Realm, Smasher of goals, Mother of Electric Body