1. de Haan, E. (2017). Large-scale survey of trust and safety in coaching supervision: Some evidence that we are doing it right. International Coaching Psychology Review, 12(1), 37-48. 2. The body of academic research on coaching supervision keeps growing. The article in International Coaching Psychology Review, (Volume 12, No. 1, March 2017) identified key benefits for coaches who receive Coaching Supervision as: • Increased self-awareness • Greater confidence • Reduced feelings of isolation • Heightened sense of belonging • Increased resourcefulness
1. de Haan, E. (2017). Large-scale survey of trust and safety in coaching supervision: Some evidence that we are doing it right. International Coaching Psychology Review, 12(1), 37-48. 2. The body of academic research on coaching supervision keeps growing. The article in International Coaching Psychology Review, (Volume 12, No. 1, March 2017) identified key benefits for coaches who receive Coaching Supervision as: • Increased self-awareness • Greater confidence • Reduced feelings of isolation • Heightened sense of belonging • Increased resourcefulness

Do Coaches Really Need Supervision? 7 Reasons Coaches Find Coaching Supervision Invaluable

The desire of making coaching a rewarding career was stronger than ever. Charlotte set the wheels in motion.

She hired someone to design a logo and a set of business cards. She created social media profiles. She wrote words for her brand spanking new website. She hesitated a bit at the paragraph for her home page promising a profound transformation, but she wrote it anyway. After all, that’s what everybody had on their websites. …


Image for post
Image for post

On the journey to becoming an effective coach, we continuously expand our awareness and ability to build great rapport, engage in highly effective listening and ask powerful questions which help clients go into the layers of their unconscious thoughts and actions.

When we face challenges within this coaching relationship, we might naturally reflect on the dialogue between the coach and the client to explore what might have been misunderstood, what might else we might have asked or how we missed a critical issue.

However, as Clutterbuck and Megginson describe in their book Further Techniques for Coaching and Mentoring (2007), there are, in fact, multiple conversations taking place and each might hold the clue to where the challenge could be resolved. He points out that both coach and client are engaged in reflective conversations before, during and after each session and that the solution to the challenge might well be outside of the spoken dialogue and within the unspoken/reflective inner dialogue. …


Image for post
Image for post

Ethical Responsibility and Decision-Making in Supervision

Despite the strong ethical position of the professional bodies in this field — best represented by the EMCC and Association for Coaching’s joint Global Code of Ethics — the fact remains that the coaching profession is self-regulated and individual coaches must frequently navigate their work using individual assessment of ethical behaviour. …


Image for post
Image for post

Bringing the Solution-Focus to Coaching Supervision

In recent years, however, coaching has become increasingly interested in dimensions that focus on the roots of behaviour, underlying beliefs systems, relational dimensions of coaching and other approaches that draw from schools of psychotherapy.

As welcome as this diversity of practice is, there has been a creeping tendency to dismiss solution-focused approaches as potentially superficial and short-term. …


Image for post
Image for post

The Seven Eyed Model: A Map to Navigate Your Coaching Supervision Practice

It stems from Peter Hawkins’ work in the early 80s. At the time Hawkins was trying to get a deeper understanding of differences in supervisory styles and concluded that they were linked to where supervisors chose to focus their attention. The model was further developed by Peter Hawkins and Robin Shohet into what supervisors know and use today.

A map to navigate your supervision practice

In their book “In Love With Supervision” Robin Shohet and Joan Shohet describe the 7 eyed model as:

a map, a framework, with which to view the landscape of supervision (…) [that] enables people to navigate their supervision practice with increasing confidence. …


Image for post
Image for post

The 3 core functions of coaching supervision

Within the helping professions, however, supervision takes on a very different meaning.

In a previous post, I described it as a space for reflective inquiry into someone’s professional practice.

But what does this reflective space set out to achieve?

In this article, I’ll lay out the three fundamental aims, or functions, of coaching supervision and what these might mean in practice during a supervisory conversation.

In its early days, the aims of supervision were neither universally agreed nor always formally identified. Established first within the therapeutic field, experienced practitioners often progressed naturally to “supervising” less experienced therapists based on their own assumptions, style and understanding of what supervision should be. …


Image for post
Image for post

What’s the difference between coaching supervision and coach mentoring?

Some coaching bodies, such as the International Coach Federation (ICF), require coach mentoring in order to achieve their professional credentials. Similarly, many coach-training schools will build a mentoring component into their requirements for completion of their course.

By contrast, other professional bodies, such as the Association for Coaching, require coaching supervision, not mentoring, to attain their credentials. …


Image for post
Image for post

Expanding your supervision range: Using Heron’s 6 Categories of Intervention in Coaching Supervision

Your landscape of exploration spans a greater range.

Your duty of care is no longer just to the person in front of you but also to their clients, the system you’re part of and the coaching profession as a whole.

Your core aims are now threefold as you take onboard the restorative, formative and normative functions of supervision.

All of this places a demand on the supervisor to bring more to the game than coaching requires.

As a coach, you become adept at facilitation and being a catalyst for the client’s thinking and self-awareness. Your client is the centre of attention and the assumption is that the client is the final arbiter of what’s right or wrong for them. …


Image for post
Image for post

What is Coaching Supervision?

What exactly is coaching supervision?

Like coaching itself, there are so many individual definitions of coaching supervision, that it can be hard to pin it down.

Yet, despite this, those in the profession certainly have a shared sense of it. We know it when we’re seeing it and we know it when we’re not seeing it!

In this article, then, my aim is not to give some final word on defining coaching supervision — indeed, that would go against the very values that supervision is based on. Instead, I will try to offer an explanation that encapsulates the many variations that exist. …

About

International Centre for Coaching Supervision

The global coaching supervision school.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store