Collective Journaling and Curatorial Round Tables — Session 5

This project is designed to create a curatorial round table and collectively journal to get to know each other and ourselves. Every week one participant will ask their questions to delve into each other’s thoughts and create a form of conversation that we all listen to instead of forcing someone to accept/understand our perception.

Dancers Beatrice Netti and Serena Angelini painted by Nadia Petković for their performance

This week’s questions are asked by Nadia Petković

1. Do you think about the materials and systems that you work within your projects and how they impact climate change and the environment? If so, what methods do you use to deal with this topic?

Eeva- Liisa Puhakka

In my last installations, I have used only recycled and old materials. I’ve collected objects from old, abandoned Japanese schools, or milk machines; pipes, motors, and pumps from old farms in Finland and made installations out of them. I’ve wanted to give old machines a new life and I am really interested in old materials and objects. I have studied environmental engineering before I went for the art way so I think I have always thought about the environmental impact of art or the materials I use. Unfortunately, I have also used lots of materials that are not good for the environment. I started with oil painting and loved it but now it wouldn’t feel good to produce lots of paintings that just sit in the storage.

Petra Martinez

Well, I usually work with people in their own local environment, so it’s easy to take environmental themes into the project. And in textile (or other) art installations, for example, I usually always use already existing materials. The goal of my work is to increase ecosocial understanding and thereby increase fairness, so the topic is most often already the starting point of my work.

Jess Cross

I try to use as many non-toxic materials as possible in my printshop and recycle paper scraps and old prints.

Zeren Oruc

Sadly, creating an exhibition or any project that requires some sort of energy to function is impacting global warming by default. Of course, the type of exhibition and the size of it what moves to the scale. Personally, I try to avoid anything that creates excessive light pollution or generates heat by consuming energy. Though, being strict with this is pretty difficult since there are a lot of great light installations and similar types of artworks to be exhibited. My other concern is the energy consumption due to the transport of artworks. At the moment, I’m mainly working with smaller artworks, so that I (or the artist)can travel with the artworks, but I don’t know how to go about this when I want to exhibit large-scale artworks.

Drifting- Nadia Petković

2. Do you ever or often question the purpose of your art/work and why it deserves to come into existence? How do you justify it, or if not, what is your inner personal dialogue around your work?

Eeva- Liisa Puhakka

All the time. But my art/doing art is also the only thing I am — sometimes — satisfied with and I feel I can have a dialogue with other people and get feedback. Referring to the question before, I also justify my art-making by that I won’t produce unnecessary papers, products, etc to the world.

Jess Cross

I always question the purpose of my artwork. Recently my work has been more for me than others. I have been experimenting with new materials and methods.

Petra Martinez

Here I have the same thoughts behind the question as in the previous. My work is mostly about eliminating inequalities, strengthening community and identity, and respecting and protecting the environment. So I have no doubt with myself that there isn’t a need or a justification for my work.

Zeren Oruc

I question what I do quite often, though sometimes this is due to having an entirely different background (law) then art. Overall, I question my position in society, as in if I’m able to make a change or if I’m helping someone with my work or not. This is probably why I end up working on projects that focus on a certain issue or connection that was overlooked before, and I want to raise some questions and create a conversation around that. Though, I have to mention that this is not something I force myself into; I think my interests are developed that way, so my work naturally leans towards this.

Photo by Jovana Banović

3. What tools do you work with and how do they influence or shape your work?

Eeva- Liisa Puhakka

My tools are research and never-ending curiosity. And that is where it always starts. The research part might take too long part of the project as it would take you anywhere and take forever :) I am not so stuck to the medium. I love experimenting with new materials, mediums, etc.

Jess Cross

I work in oil paints and alcohol ink more than any other material but I have done some work with glass as well and that really changes the work due to the transparency.

Petra Martinez

When I talk about community art, my tools are always based on community and its need, so they can be almost anything. I’ve noticed that gardening is an extremely effective tool when working with people… Most of the time, in projects like this, I always have a camera with me so I can document the process. Anyway, my work is very process-oriented making “travel more important than the destination.” In this case, the documentation of the project, making, or final piece is an important part of the work. That means that the camera is always with me :)

Zeren Oruc

As a curator, I don’t have a specific medium that I prefer, though I’m quite interested in alternative materials and works that won’t last long. When it comes to being influenced or being inspired by something, I would say this is artistic/creative/analytic thinking for me. They might sound like very different things, but I usually find myself in the same mental space when someone uses these methodologies. I should mention that, for me, artistic thinking doesn’t solely belong to artists, it can come in various forms and from people whom you wouldn’t even expect; you just need to be open to see them. I don’t know if any of this makes sense, but my work already evolves with someone’s artworks or my interpretation of their works, so being open to new tools and forms is a must for me.

Photo by Anthony Brooks

Petra Martinez asked the following questions for the second session:

2. Do you think the (contemporary) art world is equal?

3. What would your dream place be like where you would like to live? What kind of environment would it be located in?

This session is edited by Hatice Gülseroğlu, in order to retain the “real round table” format and allow participants to be surprised by answers.

Find out more about the project and the participants

Do you want to answer these questions? Leave a comment below!

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
iksvy art

Independent arts initiative and platform for artists and art professionals