As part of the “Technology in the Home” project, organised by the Chair of Human-Computer Interaction at Bauhaus University, Weimar, I led a session in which the students used speculation to explore the grey area between autonomy and control in regards to home automation this term. Within this fruitful session that started with a simple “What if…?” students speculated about exosceletons that want our best — and even more so what might possibly go wrong with the idea. To summarize, exaggerate and most of all celebrate this inspirational discussion, I wrote the following story. The words were written down by me, but the underlying thoughts came from Aalok, Ahmad, Artur, Jawad, Momena, Revathy & Yazan. …


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“Wie können wir als Gesellschaft die Herausforderungen, die im Zuge der Corona Krise entstehen, mit neuen Lösungen gemeinsam meistern?” Diese Frage stellte der WirvsVirus Hackathon der Bundesregierung Ende März 2020. In diesem Artikel gehen wir der Frage nach, wie diese Herausforderungen von den Teilnehmern verstanden wurden und welche Lösungen sie vorschlagen. Durch eine Analyse der Kurzbeschreibungen zeigen wir, dass die Teilnehmer die Krise nicht als globales, medizinisches Problem definieren, sondern stattdessen lokale und soziale Lösungen vorschlagen. Dadurch wird die Pandemie zu einem Problem, welches durch technologische Interventionen gelöst werden kann. Allerdings bedeutet das auch, dass sich die Projekte zu einem großen Teil nicht mit dem Problem selber, dem Virus, beschäftigen, sondern stattdessen die Auswirkungen navigieren. …


I have told a couple of people in my life about twiddlemuffs. At first a lot laugh — and so I learned what the word could potentially mean — but when I get to explain it most people get it. Twiddlemuffs are basically muffs, i.e. handwarmers, but they have added things to twiddle with, such as laces, buttons, ribbons … Twiddlemuffs are great for people living with dementia, because it gives someone with limited mobility and cognitive abilities something to do. …


“Is this too much?” he asked and held another flower up to his face.

“Can it ever be enough?” they replied and passed on the bottle with make up glue.

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He thought his face was covered with enough flowers to trick the machines, but why not add more for good measure? What was a man to do as one of the most influential anti-surveillance make up tutorial bloggers? His followers were not only interested in his practical tips — they could read up on them nearly anywhere — but they just liked his style. In a time where nearly everyone distorted, extended, disguised their faces and bodies to become unrecognizable it was hard to stand out. Stand out with clearly identifiable style. Identifiable, recognizable, interesting for humans that is. …


This post is based on two papers on design fiction probes, featuring the two artefacts “Homes for Life”, written Britta F. Schulte (UCLIC), Paul Marshall (UCLIC) and Anna Cox (UCLIC), presented at NordiCHI 2016 (published in the ACM Digital Library / open access pre-print here) & “HawkEye”, written by Renee Noortman and Britta F. Schulte (UCLIC), Paul Marshall (University of Bristol), Saskia Bakker (TU/e) and Anna Cox (UCLIC), presented at CHI 2019 (published in the ACM Digital Library / open access pre-print here).

Building technologies takes time, deploying them is complicated and it might take years until their impacts can be observed. Design fiction probes are a means to anticipate, communicate and elicit discussion about emerging technologies. …


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This post is based on two papers on design fiction probes, featuring the two artefacts “Homes for Life”, written by Britta F. Schulte, Paul Marshall and Anna Cox, presented at NordiCHI 2016 (published in the ACM Digital Library / open access pre-print here) & “HawkEye”, written by Renee Noortman and Britta F. Schulte, Paul Marshall, Saskia Bakker and Anna Cox, presented at CHI 2019 (published in the ACM Digital Library / open access pre-print here).

Building technologies takes time, deploying them is complicated and it might take years until their impacts can be observed. …


“Oh well, humans, am I right?” the goblin said and spat out crumbs of the heavy pastry as he started laughing. The fairy and the vampire that stood next to them at the coffee table smiled politely at the remark, while scanning the room for people they knew. During the first break of the day the coffee break in room “Dionysus” was packed. The attendees of the “Computers, past, present and futures” conference idled at the standing tables, strode around the room in search for coffee and pastries or gathered around the few sockets that could be found to plug in their laptops to catch up with emails. Or writing frantically — who knew these days. It was rare to have that many beings from the Otherworld in one room and the underlying tensions added to the buzz. …


I had a couple of conversations recently on why the heck one might go and use design fiction. Oh, and I did a PhD project on design fiction in HCI as a method. So, I think and talk about design fiction quite a bit. One common critique I encounter is that at the end you have nothing. You have not build something. While I enjoy tinkering as much as much as the next person, I heartily disagree with this statement. First, you have built something: a world; a narrative; a artefact within it. That is not nothing. That is not fairy gold. It will not disappear in the morning. It is a manifestation of your thoughts, your world view, your imagination in a shape and form that can be shared with others. Well done, pat yourself on the back. …


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I am sure I am going to drown in her … his … aaargh, their eyes. Why is this so darn hard to remember? This conversation is not going the way I thought it would be. I did not even want to be here. I mean, vampyres… Huh … Who cares about them anyway? Sooo last season. Last century even, hah. But my editor said this would be different. She would be different. The editor was wrong about one part though.

“You see, I was born a woman in 1847. I was raised a woman. But I do not feel this category fits me anymore. I am not a man either. …


My name is Emilia Williama Orania-Pugh. I am — was — the princess of Thuronia. Unfortunately my parents had to name me before my adopted brother William came along. I carry the name of my grandfather. I was expected to take the throne like he did. Now I live in exile and everyone knows me as Em. I have fallen victim to the evil plot of my brother who considers me to be his competitor in the love of a beautiful woman. A woman who appeared to both of us in a dream. We do not know if she exists, where she exists or why we both shared this dream. …

About

brifrischu

I make zines & stuff. Design. Research.Dementia & Mental Health, Craft & Activism

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