Cloud Computing

Part 2 of Intel’s Cloud Service Providers Solutions Series

Author(s): Jacek Wysoczynski, Intel Senior Manager of Product Planning and Andrew Ruffin, Intel Strategy & Business Development Manager

Intel Graphical Representation of Cloud Storage in the Data Center

In part 1 of our “Cloud Service Providers Challenges and Solutions” series we discussed the various challenges Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) and Data Center Operators are faced with day to day from costs to technically demanding applications to repairs and downtime. Now we will see how just a few of Intel’s products can help alleviate some of these issues.

Intel’s® new Optane™ solid state drives (SSDs) allow data center operators to gain the benefits of nonvolatile DIMMs (NVDIMMs) speed with the ease…


The adoption of NVM Express® SSDs in the data center is unleashing performance that was unprecedented just a few years ago. Since the inception of the SPDK project, the community has demonstrated that it’s possible to build systems capable of millions of IOPS (I/O operations per second) using commodity hardware. Over the last couple of years, we have demonstrated systems capable of over 10 million IOPS (using a single CPU core!), but now we’re ready to significantly advance the state of the art. Yes, 80 Million IOPS.

We built a 2U Intel® Xeon® server system capable of 80 MILLION 512B…


By Doug Davis, senior vice president and general manager of the Internet of Things (IoT) Group at Intel Corporation.

The U.S. has a long tradition of pioneering new methods of travel — from the first automobile to our ongoing leadership in space exploration. Today, we are facing a new challenge. The landscape for ground transportation is shifting rapidly and dramatically. A future of roads teeming with autonomous vehicles once seemed impossible; today, it’s all but inevitable.

The race away from driver-focused world is global and increasingly competitive. Other countries are moving aggressively ahead in establishing national plans and blueprints, investing…


A maker sets out to democratize invention with a simple switchboard.

What if you could create a piano from a piece of paper, watercolor paint, and a computer? Jay Silver’s mission is to make this, and many other zany creations, possible. What looks like a simple small switchboard is “duct tape from your computer to your junk,” allowing you to transform everyday objects into touch-based controls for a computer.

This series is sponsored by America’s Greatest Makers, a new reality competition in which inventors create wearable technology for the chance to win a $1M grand prize. Learn more at AmericasGreatestMakers.com.


A quadriplegic maker pursues his love of racing by rebuilding a car with custom controls.

For quadriplegic Mario Bonfante, being a maker offers a way to surmount physical limitations and pursue his passion for racing. With no technology on the market for people without full muscle function in their hands, Mario creates custom controls for his car, so that he can continue to do what he loves the most: go fast. In partnership with the nonprofit group he co-founded, he’s also able to empower less fortunate individuals to customize their vehicles and learn to drive.

This series is sponsored by America’s Greatest Makers, a new reality competition in which inventors create wearable technology for the chance to win a $1M grand prize. Learn more at AmericasGreatestMakers.com.


And other things that would delight your third-grader self.

Inventor Bob Partington is living the American Dream: making a living making things that would blow his younger self’s mind. Inventing whimsical machines began as a personal passion, and evolved into a career making things for television shows. His creations reflect his sense of humor, ranging from a paper airplane gun to the world’s slowest Rube Goldberg machine, which takes a record 6 weeks, 3 days, 7 hours, and 2 minutes to complete.

This series is sponsored by America’s Greatest Makers, a new reality competition in which inventors create wearable technology for the chance to win a $1M grand prize. Learn more at AmericasGreatestMakers.com.


A creative dad builds an enchanted forest in his daughter’s bedroom.

Father and maker Rob Adams builds a magical tree in his daughter’s bedroom. Inspired by brainstorms with his wife Nicole to create an enchanted forest, Rob employs his experience designing video game worlds to model and ultimately build the tree. The finished product wins the hearts of the entire family.

This series is sponsored by America’s Greatest Makers, a new reality competition in which inventors create wearable technology for the chance to win a $1M grand prize. Learn more at AmericasGreatestMakers.com.


Meet the brilliant young minds ready to prove that you can always make a difference, regardless of age.

A group of high school students prove that there’s no age limit on creation. As part of America’s Greatest Makers, these gifted young inventors bring their ideas to life by employing the Intel Curie Module, creating revolutionary wearable technology for stroke patients, cyclists, and pet owners.

This series is sponsored by America’s Greatest Makers, a new reality competition in which inventors create wearable technology for the chance to win a $1M grand prize. Learn more at AmericasGreatestMakers.com.


(Getty Images)

The widespread collection and utilization of data is already shifting the landscape, and this is only the beginning.

By Brian Krzanich

This weekend at the NBA All-Star Game, we’ll witness the starting points of a new revolution taking place in sports. More than ever, everything in sports is becoming digital and measurable. This will fundamentally change everything we know about the way athletes perform — and the arenas in which they compete.

Call it the digitization of sports. Digitization is a big word that’s thrown around a lot today, but when it’s used with sports, it’s truly transformational. It means that everything we do in a sport can now be captured as a piece of data. Data…


Helping Teachers Plug Kids into the Maker Movement

New Arduino electronics, powered by the tiny Intel Curie compute module, and easy-to-follow guide offer today’s students hands-on experiences that develop 21st-Century skills.

It comes in a box — all the parts and a series of experiments teachers can use to help students learn how to build electronics.

That’s how Massimo Banzi simply describes the kit and instructional program his company has developed that will soon include the new Arduino 101 development board (called Genuino 101 outside the U.S.) he co-created with Intel.

“We designed it in a way so that it’s approachable for a beginner, but then it gives…

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