Black people, intergenerational trauma is giving us a slave mentality.
Lecia Michelle 📃
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Lecia Michelle, I appreciate you sharing this ancestral retrospection with its insidious correlations to the inherited trauma of violence that has beleaguered black communities for generations. These somber episodes are part and parcel of a much larger story that conclusively reveal how the dehumanizing efforts of whiteness, have had and continue to have, deleterious effects on the psyche and persistence of Black lives.

While white moral culpability remains a persistent obstacle to our collective resolve, the intergenerational effects remain elusive predominately because of a lingering ignorance (not knowing or not wanting to know) and the faulty impressions left by a 400+ year period of slavery: about enslavers not recognizing kinships, marriages, or differentiated communities among the humans they captured; legitimizing their callousness towards breaking up African families through slave auctions; making the African kinships, marriages, and communities illegal and not applicable to what the enslavers deem as commoditized property; the insensitive and or violent derivations of colorism; and its subsequent inveiglement into a fraudulent social construct that allows our individualistic pride to betray us.

The dehumanizing social conditioning of slavery would undoubtedly evolve into intergenerational trauma of matrifocal or uterine familial structures within a racialized society to this day.

The struggle to ameliorate past and present circumstances is misplaced when we attempt to prove our humanity by beating the system or circumventing social constructs designed to exclude or denigrate others, especially Black peoples. Commonly seen as advances as in the first Black this or an exception to your race, these instances of progression are merely win-lose scenarios in the grand scheme and not win-win. As a collective we need to overstand that our humanity within the human landscape of human diversity is undebatable.

After reading this I walked away with what I believe to be a substantively empirical and teachable instance that enabled me to continue to unlearn what I have been conditioned to believe about myself, my ancestry, my collectivist black community, and the community at large.