Same Products, Different Jung

The first thing you notice about advertisements is the picture, then the body text to see what’s going on and what this advertisement is for. Now, these two ads are for deodorant, but they each try to persuade you in a different way. As you can see, the target audience is mainly older men. The color and placement on these pictures are placed and used on purpose as they’re supposed to. They each have a different appeal and USP that I will soon discuss to you on what kinds they are, and why are they being used.

Starting off with color, the old spice advertisement uses colors that are warm with good lighting and contrast. And the dove ad is completely different because it uses black and white, which is supposed to represent more of the cooler colors to make it seem more relaxing and soothing. Going back to the old spice, the placement here is the way how the picture is taken. You can see that the whole picture was taken straight forward so that the audience can get a good view about what this advertisement is trying to say. The man and the horse with a lasso is supposedly a cowboy, and cowboys are a symbol of bravery and manliness. All of it is made of soap, which advertises the body wash and the deodorant as you can see on the bottom left hand corner. Of course, they purposefully showed you the product so you can remember how they look like next time you stop at the store. Now look at the Dove ad. This picture was take at a slight angle from the right side to show you what this man is doing. By having this man wear an apron and baking some sort of food, it tries to tell you that this is the real definition of being a man.

The USP also plays a big role with advertisements. “Tough on sweat, not on skin,” is what Dove decided to use to try to get the audience to feel some sort of emotion that will make you feel like this product will really work. On old spice, their USP is usually “smell like a man,” but on this ad it mentions, “make sure your man smells like a man,” which means that not only is this targeted to men, but women as well. Both of their dominant appeal might be the same, which is need for autonomy. They both seem manly in order to make themselves look more of an independent man, but it is differently shown.

In conclusion, even though the two products are the same, the ad can look and be totally different if the visual appeals and everything else is used in another way. The USP also gives the targeted audience a sort of emotion to persuade them into buying the product.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.