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We are living in remarkable times. We can make pictures of places and people we like by pressing a button on our phones; shop from our homes for literally anything from needles to cars; reach hundreds of thousands of people through social and blogging platforms, and consume information on any topic in any volume at any time of the day.

For a person from 30 years ago it might sound very futuristic. For us it’s just how things are. Common sense.

But all that comes at a price. And that price is our privacy.

Why stay private?

I am a law-abiding citizen, I have nothing to hide. …


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Source: wallpaperscraft.com

Today is the day. The day that feels so unreal and distant, that you don’t even think about it.

Until you turn 29. Then, on that day, you realize the next year you’ll be 30.

I should say that it feels better than I expected though. Some people experience the middle age crisis and feel terrible — but I think (and hope) that I have already overcame it earlier.

Anyway, how much time is 30 years? Enough to learn some lessons, make mistakes, go through some challenges and achieve something in life.

While approaching this date, I put together a list of lessons that I have learned throughout these 30 years analyzed in retrospective. What I got is a mix of ideas backed up by science, psychology and personal experience that guide me throughout life. …


Choosing books sometimes is hard. There are so many things that interest us in books, and at the same time there are things that can turn a compelling plot into a waste of time.

At BookVoyager, we experiment with different ways to look at books, one of which is seeing a book through sentiment lenses. And when the book is quite popular, it is especially interesting to analyze it from a new angle.

One of the most popular book is Bible, so we couldn’t bypass it:

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Reading may be interesting, inspiring, emotional. But how to choose the book you will immerse in?

In 2017, up to this day there were published over 1,300,000 book titles [1]. That’s over 7,000 published books each day.

Choosing among all these titles may be tough — you have to read reviews on social networks or forums, or check out popular online magazines whether they have written something about the newest titles, or ask your friends and then read the reviews, etc.

And at the same time you already have a list of books you would like to read some day and also you know that there are books published a long time ago that are worth reading — you just didn’t stumble upon…


Visualizations act as a campfire around which we gather to tell stories. ―Al Shalloway

Recently I stumbled upon an interesting dataset — The UCS Satellite Database, which is described as

a listing of active satellites currently in orbit around the Earth

As I’m quite passionate about space exploration and visualizations, I started to think on how to visualize this information in an interesting and engaging way. This is the final result:

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http://satellizer.heroesofprogramming.com/

Taking a closer look to the dataset (version 1–1–17) we see that it has 1459 entries and 29 features (columns) related to country that operates the satellites, their use (commercial/government/military/civil), data related to their movement and altitude, launch details and a bunch of other characteristics. …


We all can see millions of colors, yet we can live much, much fewer of them.

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source: http://natbg.com/amazing-colorful-sunset-sea-pier-clouds-colors-phone-wallpapers/

Recently, I came over a quote by Arthur Schopenhauer, that caught my attention:

Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.

As with any good quote, it feels right and obvious and you don’t ponder on it too much. It’s because today, we seek for something extraordinary, something unique and different. But it hooked my attention and I thought about it for some time…

We all start as blank slates

Although we may have some genetic knowledge at birth, we do not have any understanding of the world around.

However, once we came into this world, we start to learn. …


Education is such a broad topic that it can’t be covered in a single article, not even in a single book. Nevertheless, I must say that today education discriminates against children in schools and universities.

Let’s make a parallel analysis of both the participants in education and the environment where education happens, so that we could see how things are going today.

The Participants in Education

Generally speaking, education should be a life-long journey. Whether it is or it isn’t, each person should answer to themselves. But let’s analyze the two grand categories of participants in education: children and adults.

Children

By “children” I mean those people who are not yet psychologically mature. And although some individuals do not mature even in their fourties, we’ll generalize “children” to be individuals that attend some formal education institution (school, college, university, etc). …


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Are you a “people oriented” or a “goal oriented” person?

How many times have you heard this question? And how many times did you try to actually cover both parts when attempting to answer it? Or at least try to sound not too “not-at-all-people-oriented” person or not too “all-I-care-about-is-results” person? And sometimes you do this not because you want to make a better impression, but because you kind of get along with people really good and you are a goal oriented person.

There are two kinds of people…

This question pretends to be one of those that categorizes people into two mutually exclusive groups, as per the popular…


I love to read. Mostly it is work related literature — posts and books about Python, Data Science, JavaScript. But lately, thanks to my wife, I started reading some non-technical literature as well — science fiction, to be more specific.

I’ve started with classics (Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov) and got fascinated while diving in the worlds they’ve created, the worlds that were supposed to be our future (some of them are our present, some of them aren’t, but this is a topic for another post).

A lot of people enjoy reading books because of their emotional component — a good fiction book takes you on a crazy ride on a roller coaster, making you happy or sad, empathetic or indifferent. …

About

Iulian Gulea

Web Developer. Entrepreneur. Love technology, psychology, almonds and good music.

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