Why There Is Power In Being Yourself


Years ago I thought that if people didn’t see me bigger in life than I actually was then that would be a downfall. Now I’ve learned that showing people how small you are while doing big things is so much sexier.

When I first opened my business at the ripe young age of 22 I was keen to get my name out there. My website was launched and I carefully picked words in it that made me sound big. Phrases like; “We are Sydney’s best…”, “We are the only…”, “Our school teaches…”. All references included a connection to “we “ or “our” as opposed to “me” and “I”.

Brands that are thriving today are the ones that give you a look into the lives behind the founders themselves. It’s as if you’re buying into the person behind the brand as much as into the brand itself.

Nowadays it’s a different story for me. With social media offering people a direct glimpse into your life it’s slightly easier to become a household name, well at least easier than it was years back. Of course, you have to get through all the noise but when you do and do it well people get to see your brand for who it really is. And yes, I said “Who”.

Since scaling back my ‘online’ presence to being more ‘inline’ with who I am and what I personally want to do to help and connect with people directly, my following has grown. Slowly, but steadily.

Take a look at the likes of Ellen DeGeneres, Oprah, Gary Vaynerchuk, Anthony Robbins, and even Apple. They are all human brands. Apple? It’s a company! Yes, but it has humanised into a culture, a brand that feels apart of everything we do. Realistically, only humans should be able to have so much influence, but we have since learned otherwise.

Starting small and growing big is sexy. Showing people how hard you work at something personally each day is sexy. It’s addictive. It’s empowering. It’s encouraging. It rubs off. And people want to be apart of that.

Be real.

If you enjoyed this post please share it with someone human. I’d really appreciate that.

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