How writing through grief can ease the pain

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Photo by Edu Lauton on Unsplash

I finished writing my first book last month.

How was this possible?

Technically there are two reasons…


The sweet balm of words to soothe the pain.

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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Grief is a universal experience.

We…


And other unhelpful sentiments directed toward the bereaved.

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Photo by dylan nolte on Unsplash

Anyone who has lost a loved one knows that their friends, family, and acquaintances fall into one of three categories: they will either say nothing, say something, or say the wrong thing.

Death is one of the least talked-about topics in our western culture. Many people find themselves unsure of what to say to a person who has lost someone close. We tend to repeat the same trite things without examining whether or not they are helpful, keen on getting our condolences over and done with, and moving on.

Conversations about death are uncomfortable. They remind us of our mortality and the mortality of those we hold dear. We don’t want to think about loss and we definitely don’t want to talk about it. …


Please just let me respond to “How are you?” with “I’m good.”

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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Everyone knows someone who insists on correcting every little grammar mistake they hear or see.

This is the type of friend you don’t want to catch you spelling “their” wrong if you mean “they’re” or “there,” or saying something is “very unique” (unique implies one of a kind — something cannot be more or less than one of a kind, explanation courtesy of my friend). …


Does one have to cancel out the other?

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Photo by mali desha on Unsplash

Imagine this: You are a childless woman in your late 20’s, married for less than a year, and dog mom to a seven-year-old Australian Cattle Dog named Bear. You and your spouse have discussed expanding your family with a couple of two-legged children at some point in the future, but at the moment, you are content with your family of three.

On a day like any other, you agree to meet a friend for coffee. You haven’t seen this friend in some time as she recently gave birth to a bouncing baby girl. You catch up and the conversation eventually…


Should writers avoid this literary device?

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Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

I recently decided my memoir was ready to find its place with a developmental editor. After months of revisions and more revisions, I arrived at a crossroads many writers are familiar with — I’ve edited until I can’t see straight but I’m not ready to pursue publishing: Where do I go from here? I decided I needed another pair of eyes. And not just the eyes of friends and family who, for as much as I love them, do not have the experience or the skills to say much more than, “I like it,” or, “I don’t like this part…


Readers aren’t expected to like every book but these reviews cut deep.

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Photo by Karim MANJRA on Unsplash

I love reading memoir. Memoirists are brave individuals who launch their stories into the abyss in the hope of connecting with others. The best memoirs I’ve read draw me into the writer’s world and give me a new perspective on life. They inspire, commiserate, give meaning to life, and reinforce the human connection.

Following the death of my mother last year, I turned my attention to grief memoirs.


Seriously, four months.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Let me start off by saying that learning a foreign language is HARD and those attempting to do so will progress at their own pace. That being said, I’d like to share how, based on my personal experience, it is possible to become proficient in a foreign language in a short amount of time as long as you have the right combination of resources, a positive attitude, and steadfast determination to do so.

Throughout my language-learning journey, I have struggled, failed, and thought to myself countless times, Why am I still doing this? …


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Image by amurca from Pixabay

I have lived in Portugal for nearly three years now and am fairly settled into my life here. After reflecting on my move abroad and what I would do differently if I had to do it over again, I wanted to share some of the things I wish I knew before making the big move.

There were definitely things I didn’t even think about nor expect to experience and there was no way I could have predicted all the challenges and curve balls (even good ones!) that would be sent my way. …


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Photo by Juri Gianfrancesco on Unsplash

Learning a foreign language can be an incredibly rewarding experience — it challenges you to rewire your neural linguistic pathways, you gain a skill many people would be envious to have, you sharpen your memory and cognitive capacities, and you expand your perspective on the world around you, among many other benefits.

For many people, overcoming the obstacle between learning a language and actually using it can be difficult to do. After all, we use language to communicate with others, establish social connections, and pass on our collective knowledge and experiences. Language is an intricate part of who we are.

Isabel Cohen

Writer / Word lover / Teacher of small humans

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