According to Wikipedia, “lean software development is a translation of lean manufacturing principles and practices to the software development domain”. We very often think of Wikipedia as a main source of truth but by the encyclopedia’s own rules the entries published there are supposed to be based on reliable sources, and in the case of lean software development, it is actually the book in question that introduced the concept first time and that the Wikipedia‘s entry is based on. It gives to the book historical importance next to its undoubted practical value.

Historically, “Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit” has…


My first moments with the book, when “researching” it online after a brief recommendation, were slightly problematic. The book’s title doesn’t say a lot. Its subtitle — “Insights from inside Google that will transform how you live and lead” doesn’t say much more. Actually, the subtitle turned out to be a little bit misleading for me. I looked at the book from my own, an engineering manager's, perspective and I expected it to be about managing engineering teams (Google, right?), about best practices, and processes that an engineering leader could apply in daily life at work. …


A short story of OKRs at TrustYou — where we failed, what we achieved, and what we still need to improve.

Photo by Tamarcus Brown on Unsplash

TrustYou is the largest feedback platform in the world. We analyze hundreds of millions of hotel reviews, we do it for more than half a million hotels, and we have tens of thousands of hotels using directly our platform as the company’s customers. We have achieved this without ever receiving considerable funding and although this is something that we are proud of, this has also affected our engineering journey in a way that, well, we are not always that happy about. …


In summer 1962, Abraham Maslow spent some time visiting Non-Linear Systems, Inc. in California where he was given the opportunity to inspect the work organization in the company. During this time, Maslow regularly dictated his observations and then had them written down, constituting this way his journals on the management. These thoughts have been published in 1965 as a book “Eupsychian Management” and then re-published in 1998 as “Maslow on Management”, the edition that I am reviewing here.

In his journals, Maslow discusses the challenges and directions for the improvement of management practices. Maslow’s thoughts span generations, societies, and continents…


Management best practices collected into a framework for improving performance of software development teams

Photo by Quino Al on Unsplash

I had been working as an engineering manager already for quite a while when I understood that my ultimate responsibility as a manager is helping these teams peak their performance. It doesn’t mean that I didn’t care about my teams’ performance before, but putting it in the very center of my attention and starting to treat all my daily practices as steps toward this main goal allowed me to build a consistent and relatively easy to replicate performance improvement framework for software development teams.

There is a well-known repertoire of performance-related practices, retrospectives, feedback talks, 1-on-1s, and so forth that…


The book’s main promise is to help middle management to work efficiently and although with some slight inefficiencies (more about it later) I believe it achieves this goal really well. The author does his job introducing various management best practices and does it in a very clear and systematic way which makes things easier to understand and internalize.

An interesting fact about the book is that it was first published in 1983, that is, in times when the generally accepted management style was only starting to transition from authority-based to coaching and motivating but the book’s content promoting, among others…


“Accelerate” is neither technical nor typical engineering management book that describes management techniques, practices or methodologies. What it describes are dependencies between technical and management organizational capabilities and software development performance of an organization and the actual research process that identified these dependencies.

The book’s subtitle (“Building and Scaling High Performing Technology Organizations”) is a little bit misleading as you will not find there a lot about the actual process of building a technology organization but I would still strongly recommend it to the engineering managers as the analysis of dependencies between capabilities and organizational performance described in the book…


The book’s main goal is to describe steps in the career ladder of a technical manager and I believe it fulfills this promise very well starting the story with discussing mentoring and finishing it describing roles of CTO and VP Engineering.

If you are already in your current role of a technical manager for a while, I don’t think you will find a lot of advice in the book that could broaden your horizons considerably for that particular role but also I don’t think it is possible to dive deeper given the size of the book and I don’t think…


TrustYou is a company that has built the world’s largest guest feedback platform and provides its products to over 50,000 hotels all over the world. In this blog you will learn how we work at our engineering department. We are not going to tell you here how to do things the right and only way but I promise you will find a lot of interesting and real life stories showing how we make and sometimes break things on our side.

Enjoy the read!

Jacek Mech

VP Engineering at TrustYou, leader and agile methods enthusiast.

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