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In this episode, we learn about the societies as they begin to solidify into city states and have a greater sense of culture. It is an introduction to societies in general but laying a background for the exploration of kingdoms and empires that we will undertake over the next few episodes.

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I did not plan to publish this year but I think this is important.

The Discourse is an idea. A simple, testable idea: the things that separate us are not as strong as the things that bind us.

I would like to test this idea.

What?

So what is The Discourse?

The Discourse is a safe space for meaningful conversations about the things that affect us and that we care about. This non-exhaustive list includes: Relationships, morality and purpose, meaning, love, wealth and health. …


Some parts of Igboland have an interesting way of welcoming people into a new day. We ask, “I boola chi”, which means “Have you broken the dawn”. It is a beautiful phrase which works both literally and metaphorically. To break the dawn (or daybreak) means to break the darkness. According to this fascinating thread, break is used in a rare form here, meaning to burst forth or explode onto the scene. …


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Photo by Ivandrei Pretorius from Pexels

One of the most influential movies over the past two decades is the Lion King. Like most millennials, I have a strong, deeply nostalgic connection to the characters and the story, and it was probably the first animated movie I ever saw. One of the most profound moments in the story arrives when Simba is on the throes of a catharsis. Nala had found Simba relishing his new liberty outside the Pridelands. Her reintroduction and her responsibilities forced Simba to interact with a past he had tried to bury deeply. This past still binds Simba, preventing him from seeing the full picture and making an unfiltered choice. …


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The fracture of Nigerian society is often claimed to be the result of the colonial merge of many different ethnic groups together without a social contract. One might exist within the different tribes of the Republic, for example, the Igbos, Yorubas, Tivs, Urhobos and Hausas, but it is certain that none exists among Nigeria’s diverse tribes. However, far from being an ethnic issue, this lack of a social conversation about the construct of the society affects sex, sexuality, religion and financial status as well. Society’s only purpose is to establish a system that works mutually for all inhabitants within it. …


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Photo by Miguel Á. Padriñán from Pexels

The whispers of discontent often grow in the face of oppression. In Nigeria, there is a view, which can be said to be widespread, of the failure of the Nigerian state. Everyday, there is news of the oppressive nature of this society: class violence, violence against women, religious violence, ethnic violence and yet all things within a society exist with the permission of that society. No society exists without the continuing consent of the people within that society. It is through this fabric that we mould and form societal norms. Of course, modern Nigerian society is not the originator of its present faults and the existence of national borders prevents the practicing of ‘continuing consent’ to its fullest extent. However, these limitations are merely hindrances on the path to progress and for this path to lead to a just resolution, it must be preceded by an examination of the nature of Nigerian society. Knowing this, we must then ask what constitutes the Nigerian fabric. What are those things we have tacitly accepted as the foundation on which we now build? Are these things acceptable? Are they just? Are they good? …


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Photo by Dom J from Pexels

To understand the history of any society, we must attempt to determine the origins of that society and the origins of Nigerian history is a combination of many different origins. [many different tribes and cultures] Archaeological evidence puts habitation of what is now known as Nigeria at several thousand years. Like all ancient societies, many of these societies were small clusters and because of this, they were largely decentralized and perhaps egalitarian.

The oldest evidence of human remains in Nigeria is about dated to have existed at about 9000BCE that’s more than 11,000 years before today. These remains were found in Iwo Eleru rock shelter which is what we now call South Western Nigeria [or Yoruba land]. …


TW: This post might be triggering.

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Justice extracts a heavy toll. On whose back is this burden laid? Is it the law of the land? The legislators in whom we have vested our sovereignty? Is it on the backs of those to whom the victim of injustice is most closely associated? Does their love of the victim obligate them to pursue justice more relentlessly than everyone else? We see this often of course, but I am not convinced. Evil is far too important an enemy to be left only to those to whom injustice has been enacted against.

Rape is one of the supreme forms of evil that this world has to offer. It is not like killing where it can be justified in a few forms, or like lying where it can be justified in many forms. Rape is a unique form of immorality in the sense that it is always evil. There is no scenario where rape is justifiable and even as retribution, rape requires that you lose your own humanity even if only for a moment. There is nothing that ‘takes’ quite like rape. It is the ultimate negation of essence. …


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Nigeria is a hilarious country. Not hilarious in the pure form that comedy can exist in, where it is true joy that draws out deep laughter from our soul but in the way that we tend to apply comedy, as a mask or filter for pain. Nigeria is the sort of comedy that needs to be a comedy because otherwise, the pain of the tragedy would be too much to bear.

It is clear to me that our desire to make light work of our situation stems from a deep seated feeling that we are effectively in a state of perpetual pain, it genuinely feels like hell. In Viktor Frankl’s astonishing book, Man’s Search For Meaning, he details how many of the prisoners in the Nazi concentration camps coped with the intense dehumanization; comedy was one of these ways. An incredibly powerful tool, it prevented many minds from breaking and he writes, “It is well known that humor, more than anything else in the human make-up, can afford an aloofness and an ability to rise above any situation, even if only for a few seconds.” …


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Photo by Miguel Á. Padriñán from Pexels

Who doesn’t love a story of winning against the odds? It is at the cornerstone of our storytelling and is universal across culture. At the center of these stories are heroes who brave the odds; relentless and fearless star gazers. We count Winnie Mandela, Hercules, Achilles, Thomas Sankara, among these names. It is their ability to draw from deep reservoirs of faith that forms the foundation of the true entrepreneurial spirit.

The story is very different in the West African Republic called Nigeria. These are not the people, nor the stories, that drive the Nigerian entrepreneurial spirit. We do not brave the cruel uncertainty of risk because in pursuit of of innovation, instead we do so because poverty is a real and present danger in the lives of many Nigerian men and women. …

About

Jachimike

My thoughts, like me, are imperfect.

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