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George Floyd’s death, after having his neck pinned down by a Minneapolis police officer for nearly nine minutes, has sent the United States into outrage. In his final moments, Floyd uttered the words, “I can’t breathe” — the exact last words of Eric Garner, who died in 2014 after being placed in an NYPD officer’s chokehold.

Every night, protesters have taken to the streets of cities across the country. And so have units of police officers equipped with tear gas, riot shields, rubber bullets and stun grenades.

I’ve attended a number of protests in Brooklyn, where I live, over the past few days. I’ve witnessed peaceful protests, with protesters chanting, marching, kneeling and praying in solidarity. …


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With college graduation approaching soon, spring is typically prime recruiting and application season for young job seekers. But this year, amid the COVID-19 outbreak, things are a bit different.

Instead of taking on new hires, companies across the United States are responding to the disease by laying off employees. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that COVID-19 could claim 3 million U.S. jobs by summer.

Naturally, now is not a great time to be entering the job market.

“I thought my anxiety couldn’t get worse … but now i will be ‘graduating’ college amid a mass pandemic and attempting to find a career in a plummeting job market, cheers to all the anxious 2020 grads!!!!!,” …


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The unemployment rate for recent college graduates is much lower than it was 10 years ago. But, too often, recent graduates struggle to land positions in line with their degrees. To support themselves, some are forced to take jobs they’re considered to be overqualified for.

Currently, 41 percent of bachelor’s degree holders ages 22–27 are “underemployed,” meaning they’re working jobs that don’t require a four-year degree, according to newly updated data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That’s despite a relatively low unemployment rate for recent graduates, which has dropped from 6.8 percent to 3.9 …


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More than ever before, today’s college students say they feel a responsibility to help those around them. Yet, their passion for humanitarianism is not effectively translating to action, as volunteer rates for students have dropped since the early 2000s. At this point, just 26 percent of college students are volunteering.

While it would be easy to shrug this off and pin it on college students for not following through on their word, it’s not that simple. Increasing the number of student volunteers requires action, both from colleges and nonprofit organizations.

“Youth’s historically high interest in doing good will not automatically translate into action without the right opportunities,” Robert Grimm, director of the University of Maryland’s (UMD’s) Do Good Institute, said in a statement. In 2018, he co-authored a report highlighting this trend with his colleague Nathan Dietz, an associate research scholar at the institute. …


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For decades, U.S. colleges and universities have been giving an advantage to the children and relatives of their alumni — otherwise known as “legacy students.” But today, the vast majority of college students are against this practice.

The concept of legacy admissions has been around since the 1920s. And it’s common practice at many of the nation’s colleges and universities. Three-quarters of the top 100 schools in the United States employ legacy preferences, and nearly all of the top 100 liberal arts colleges do.

But in recent years, concerns have grown around the fairness of giving legacy students a leg up in admissions. …


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Today’s young adults, many of whom are in college, have worse mental health than any generation before them. Suicide rates among Americans aged 15–24 have risen 51 percent over the past decade, according to the CDC.

And when you add in the academic, social and financial pressures of going to college, along with the fact that many students are leaving home to live on their own for the first time, things get even worse.

Currently, 36 percent of college students qualify as depressed, 31 percent have moderate to severe anxiety, and 14 percent have considered suicide in the past year, according to the most recent Healthy Minds Network (HMN) study, which surveyed more than 62,000 students attending colleges and universities across the United States. …


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With just over a decade left to prevent irreversible damage caused by climate change, the value of a degree in sustainability has never been higher.

Consumers, organizations, and businesses across all types of industries have put an unprecedented focus on becoming more sustainable. Many have already laid out substantial plans with ambitious goals.

But, for all of these entities to successfully achieve all of their sustainability goals, they need the leadership of qualified sustainability experts. So, in recent years, colleges and universities across the United States have put a tremendous focus on growing their sustainability departments. …


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While 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg was at the United Nations for the Youth Climate Summit, artist Michael Pinsky walked her through his “pollution pods” — an installation of five climate-controlled chambers meant to emulate the current air quality in five different cities around the world.

By pumping heat and various perfumes into 19-foot-wide plastic domes, Pinsky is able to mimic what breathing conditions are like in Tautra, London, New Delhi, Beijing and São Paulo.

Currently, air pollution is responsible for 7 million deaths around the world each year. …


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For decades, humans have fantasized about the idea of an artificial intelligence (AI) takeover. Science fiction movies like “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “The Terminator” and “I, Robot” enthralled viewers for years, mostly because they teased the chance of an AI-driven, dystopian future.

But today, that dystopian future may be too close for comfort.

Before his passing, Stephen Hawking famously warned humanity by saying, “Once humans develop artificial intelligence, it would take off on its own and re-design itself at an ever increasing rate.” He even suggested it could spell the end of the human race.

Since then, many AI experts have continued to preach such warnings. Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla, SpaceX and Neuralink, has even gone as far as to say that AI is more dangerous than nuclear weapons. …


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A recent study found that students who identify as transgender, gender nonconforming, or genderqueer, are up to four times more likely than their cisgendered peers to suffer from mental health issues.

To come to that conclusion, researchers looked at self-reported rates of depression, anxiety, eating disorders, self-injury and suicidality in more than 1,200 “gender minority students” attending 71 different colleges and universities around the country — the most comprehensive such study yet.

They found that nearly 80 percent of gender minority students met the criteria for at least one mental health issue.

Fifty-eight percent of the gender minority students screened positive for depression, compared to 28 percent of cisgendered students. More than 33 percent of the gender minority students reported “seriously thinking about suicide” within the past year, compared to 10 percent of cisgendered students. And 53 percent of gender minority students said they have intentionally injured themselves in a non-suicidal way, compared to 20 percent of cisgendered students. …

About

Jackson Schroeder

Journalist. Current News & Content Manager at TUN.com. Avid fan of music, environment, football

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