Day Two — Learning by People


Yesterday afternoon/early evening we finally received our first four assignments and assessments, mainly focusing on HTML.

I know the assessments and the assignments were pretty long and would likely take some people a good chunk of time to complete.

Fortunately I took the Web Development Basics class that covered HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and jQuery.

I say fortunately because everything in the night’s work I understood and could probably teach to someone pretty easily the use of tags, different types of tags, and nesting.

There was fortunately some new items that I got to grasp that I had seen but didn’t understand so that’s helpful.

Also I think it would be helpful to record what I struggled with, understood (simply), and what I’m looking forward to. So I’ll try to keep that structure going forward.

Struggles: Git. We spent a good chunk of the day yesterday getting everything set up correctly and I really struggled with Git. Not the commands or even merging. That was easy enough. What I struggled with was actually setting up my Git locally and pushing to GitHub. Turns out I had an issue with SSH Keys. Then I struggled with connecting a local repository with a remote repository (ie. GitHub). Turns out I needed to use $ git push remote add url and then $ git push remote add origin. Lesson learned. I’m sure with more practice I’ll pick it up faster.

Understood: HTML. Honestly because of the Web Development Basics course it makes sense. Sure Attributes and how they are being used is still relatively new I was however exposed to them. Fortunately we got a list of Attributes sent to use that should be really helpful going forward.

Looking Forward: The next few weeks we do swapped learning and students teach each other. In previous experience I loved this so I’m kind of excited to see how it all works out. There’s something about showing someone how to do it and asking questions of them on how they did it. It makes it easier to digest as you have to teach someone that knows just about the same amount of information as you.

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