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4 Things You Might Not Know About Gose

Here Gose Nothin’

Jacob Densford
May 19, 2016 · 5 min read

By Jacob Densford

WARNING: THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE CONTAINS PUNS.

I’ve never been very interested in sour beers. I could make a long list of all my favorite styles and breweries and specific beers I enjoy, but it would be easier to just say what I don’t like: sours. There have been plenty of beers in my life, but they’ve never been sour.

Gose (pronounced like “rose” with an “uh” at the end), or Leipziger Gose as it’s formally called, is one such sour beer style that I’ve never had any desire to try. Then I read an article by self-described beer snob Joe Keohane: “Craft Beer is Dead — Gose Killed It,” and it changed everything

Go read his article; I’ll wait.

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Hurry, though.

Back? Good.

Now, I’m not even going to touch on his main point, except to say that I disagree. Is craft beer really dead? Are we out of new ideas? Is the hobby imploding? I don’t think so. (It makes a catchy article title, though.) No, the reason I bring up Keohane’s article is because, without it, I might never have been introduced to the Wonderful World of Gose.

I bathed in salt water, I perfumed my life with coriander, I sucked down golden nectar with puckered lips. For the past few weeks, I consumed nothing but that salty, herby, sour beverage that is gose. What have I learned? Joe Keohane doesn’t know shit.

Maybe you’re sitting/standing there, scratching your head, staring at your laptop/phone/tablet screen, thinking, “what the heck is a gose anyway?” I’ll let Beeradvocate tell you:

An old German beer style from Leipzig, Gose is an unfiltered wheat beer made with 50–60% malted wheat, which creates a cloudy yellow color and provides a refreshing crispness and twang. A Gose will have a low hop bitterness and a complementary dryness and spice from the use of ground coriander seeds and a sharpness from the addition of salt. Like Berliner Weisse beers, a Gose will sometimes be laced with various flavored and colored syrups. This is to balance out the addition of lactic acid that is added to the boil.

The following facts might not convince you to try a gose — that’s for the recounting of our tasting in next week’s article — but you will learn lots of neat stuff. That’s a thing that people like to do, right?

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1. Gose was Originally from Goslar, Not Leipzig

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2. Salty, Naturally

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

3. The Reinheitsgebot Does Not Apply

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Do your thing, Hasselhoff.

4. World War II Almost Killed Gose


There you have it. Next week, we’ll taste seven different goses and give you our ratings and impressions, as well as tell you where to buy them if you happen to live in Akron, Ohio. In the meantime, check out this excellent article by the German Beer Institute. When you’re done, go out and impress your friends with all your new knowledge.


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