Top 5 Festive Foods from around the World

Just like it’s 5 o’clock somewhere, it’s surely time to celebrate somewhere in world. All year round, there are celebrations going on in different countries, and that is a delightful culinary experience just waiting to happen.

If you do happen to visit the place where the festival is being celebrated, there will be enthused yet professional tour guides waiting to take you to the heart of a festival and feed your soul with the celebratory food on offer. However, even in the confines of your home, you don’t have to sit back and wait for the calendar date to roll around for the next celebration to get your classic festive recipe out — rather, stay ahead of the game and keep tabs on festive foods from around the word. However, even in the confines of your home, you don’t have to sit back and wait for the calendar date to roll around for the next celebration to get your classic festive recipe out — rather, stay ahead of the game and keep tabs on festive foods from around the word.

Check out these top 5 food items that tie in with festive events in different countries around the world. You never know where your stomach will guide you around the globe.

Hanukkah — Israel

The Jewish community certainly get the goods out for their celebrations. The star culinary treats on Hanukkah are traditional Latkes, which are potato cakes fried in oil or made with chees. Served golden and crispy, they can be topped with an assortment of sauces or even cooked up in creative variations. The feasting doesn’t stop there thought so make sure you save room for dessert. Sufganiyot are fried doughnuts filled with jelly that are a thoroughly indulgent treat. The foods may sound like they have high oil content, but this is symbolic of the miracle of Hanukkah, where an oil lamp burned extraordinarily slowly for eight days.

An Orthodox Christmas — Ukraine

Ukraine is home to primarily orthodox Christians. This means that, not only is Christmas celebrated on a different sate (by the Julian calendar rather than the Gregorian one) but also the Christmas dinner is a vegetarian fare that excludes fat, sugar, and meat. This may sound like it would rule out a lot, but creativity can be seen at its best here, with 12–13 course scrumptious courses prepared within these parameters. The star attraction here is the Kutya, a wheat based pudding served in the first course. The main ingredients are wheat berries sweetened with honey and augmented with dry fruits and poppy seeds. Just make sure you wait until the first star appears in the night sky to enjoy this family tradition.

Kwanzaa — America

This holiday celebrates African heritage throughout America, aiming to reconnect with the tastes of culture through traditional African dishes. A real favourite is peanut and squash soup that is flavoured with traditional herbs and spices. A sweet potato pie with collard greens is also a traditional hit for Kwanzaa.

Eid Ul Fitr

A month long of fasting is followed by three days of gastronomic treats celebrating the end of Ramadan. And while there is a mouth-watering range of dishes conjured up in this gastronomic celebration with biryani, kebabs and kormas galore, the kingpin of them all is the Sheer Kurma, a dish made of sevaiyan cooked in milk and sweetened with dates.

Makar Sankrat/Pongal — Hindu

From the south of India to the north, festivities come alive mid January to celebrate the spring harvest season. This holiday is considered as the beginning of a new day for the gods after a six-month long night.

The harvest festival is celebrated in different ways over different parts of India. For example in Tamilnadu, Pongal is a 4-day affair, with pongal rice being the main dish served over breakfast. The northern regions of Delhi and Punjab see sweet savouries being prepared aplenty with an emphasis on sesame or til, as it is locally called. So look forward to gobbling down til laddooos to the accompaniment of warming foods such as jaggery , makki ki roti and sarson ka saag

A Traveller, Food Lover & International/local Tour Guides by profession. She has an extensive experience of local places which she has gained while travelling across the globe.