Image for post
Image for post

My latest guest on Creative Intelligence was Parry Malm, CEO of Phrasee. The company uses AI-powered tools to generate marketing copy for well-known brands such as Ebay, Dominos, Groupon and Virgin Holidays. Throughout history, copywriting has been integral to the success of millions of marketing campaigns, and with the birth of new advertising channels such as podcasts and social media, brands have needed to adapt how they market their products to appeal to the masses. …


Image for post
Image for post

Artificial intelligence is nothing new. It’s ingrained into our everyday lives, whether that’s unlocking our smartphones with face ID, Facebook offering us friend suggestions, or getting real-time traffic updates on Google Maps. AI touches a range of industries and requires an understanding of different fields including neuroscience and economics, which is why my latest guest on Creative Intelligence was first drawn to the fascinating concept over 30 years ago.

Michael Wooldridge is a professor and head of computer science at the University of Oxford. He’s published more than 400 articles on the subject and has seen problems being solved by machine learning that communities have been working on for years. …


Image for post
Image for post

“We’ve got the how but what is the why?” It’s a question I must have asked a thousand times over the last 10 years or so. I feel it is perennially relevant to digital technology and the myriad developments we’re seeing happening all over the world. We know we’re seeing unprecedented, revolutionary change in pretty much every field. But do we know why?

The answer, or answers, are nebulous. There used to be a consensus that progress was an inherently good thing and that that was reason enough in itself for technological and social development. …


Image for post
Image for post

In the latest episode of Creative Intelligence, I had the pleasure of speaking with Rhonda Scharf. She is an author based between Ottawa and Fort Myers who, since 1993, has helped tens of thousands of people in dozens of countries to adapt and thrive in their work environments. Rhonda’s take is refreshingly contemporized, and it was a pleasure to discuss it with her. I really wanted to drill down into the thesis behind her latest book about the impact artificial intelligence will have on the future of the workforce. …


Image for post
Image for post

For the latest episode of Creative Intelligence, I sat down in New York with Pranav Yadav. He came into the world of work with a triple major in math, physics and economics, and unsurprisingly got snapped up by Wall Street where he worked at Goldman Sachs. What’s really impressive though, is he then took the jump into digital marketing consulting knowing that it was not an area in which he had expertise — but, crucially, it was one in which he was most fascinated. At the age of 25, he was appointed CEO of Neuro-Insight, a company that uses brain imaging to gauge the impact of marketing on the human subconscious. …


Image for post
Image for post

I’ve long held the opinion that one of the dangers of technology is that it moves too fast. We often end up running before we can walk, and we’ll end up too far down the road without asking ourselves how we got there. Did everyone need a website in the year 2000? Probably not. The resulting hype around “dotcom” cost the stock market dearly. …


Image for post
Image for post

Like so many concepts in the modern world, AI has two personas. One is its ‘real world” application, in which it’s happily and silently getting on with day-to-day tasks such as identifying spam emails, evaluating building blueprints for fire risks, or running traffic simulations. The other persona is the one that tends to inhabit the public consciousness. This is the (as yet) fictional scenario where AI has evolved into a kind of self-interested psychopath, hell-bent on world domination and the annihilation of the human race (like the cyborg assassin in The Terminator or Agent Smith in The Matrix).

While I’m happy to enjoy the fast-paced plotlines of these films, their demonization of AI should remain firmly fictional. Our fear of it is completely unfounded. We shouldn’t forget that at its simplest level, machine learning is essentially just an algorithm using a specific number and a process of elimination. The earliest computers such as Babbage’s Analytical Engine — first sketched out way back in 1833 — used exactly the same principles to do complex equations. Now that technology is more prevalent, not because it’s just been discovered, but because we now have more uses for it. …


Image for post
Image for post

In the latest episode of the Creative Intelligence podcast, I was fortunate enough to speak to Payal Arora, Professor of Technology, Values and Global Media Cultures at Erasmus University Rotterdam. Payal is also the Founder and Executive Director of Catalyst Lab, an initiative that brings the academic and business worlds together to engage the public on social issues.

Part of Payal’s mission is to help us address the “need to reimagine society in a way that is not prescribed.” A huge part of that is finding the frontiers of digital freedom, something we can do by using digital as another public space in which we can express ourselves in a way we could not in an inherently more conservative reality. …


Image for post
Image for post

As we enter the second decade of the 21st century, it’s tempting to think that many of the institutions that were founded in the previous centuries are now out of date. History is scrutiny, so it is testament to the success of a body like UNESCO that it continues to not only be relevant, but also formative, in our understanding of the world 73 years after it was first founded.

In the latest edition of the Creative Intelligence podcast I spoke with UNESCO’s Section Chief of Research, Policy & Foresight, John Crowley. John explained that much of the organization’s original mission, to rebuild the world of ideas and intellectual cooperation on the rubble of the Second World War, had largely been achieved by the 1960s. …


Image for post
Image for post

For the latest Creative Intelligence podcast I was joined by neuroscientist, lecturer and author Dr. Tara Swart. She’s previously spoken at a TED series on the mind, and her book The Source examines how we can further our potential by better understanding how our brains interpret the world.

Obviously, Tara’s degree in neuroscience has led her to continually ask questions. But what was intriguing for me was that her curiosity has been centered around her own capabilities, and her role in the world. …

About

James Ingram

CEO Splashlight and Telmar

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store