HUNGER STRIKE

©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved

At noon on March 2nd 2016, Eight Iranian refugees sewed their mouths shut to protest inhumane treatment and the demolition of the southern half of “The Jungle”- an illegal refugee camp on the French/ British border. Their section of the camp was one of the first scheduled to be bulldozed by French authorities. A sign held while objecting to forced evictions, violence against asylum seekers, and the lack of basic services read: “We feel nobody listens to us, so we will not eat until our demands are met.” The nine men, between the ages of 17 and 46, ended their strike after 23 days, and posted a statement on their blog: “We have decided to end our hunger strike not as a direct response to the negotiations with the French State but out of respect for those supporting us, who have a genuine concern for our welfare, and as a gesture of faith that the State abide by their limited assurances to protect and improve the conditions of those in the North of The Jungle.” Fasting has been an accepted form of protest since pre-Christian days in northern Europe, where the fast was carried out on the doorstep of those accused of wrong-doing, to shame them for injustice or a lack of generosity. According to the Encyclopedia of Food and Culture, not only is food vital for nourishment, it characteristically represents charity and hospitality, so its refusal marks a non-violent appeal for change in community.

©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved.
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved.
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved
©James Fisher 2017 All rights Reserved