New research looks at the role imagination plays in the innovation culture of business, and hints at how to reclaim your imagination.

Image for post
Image for post

New research undertaken by Redvespa may help us understand the reasons behind New Zealand’s slide down the Global Innovation Index — from 9th in 2009 to 25th in 2019.

Redvespa’s Imagination in Business research looked into the place of innovation and imagination in New Zealand organisations and identifies the limitations of our number 8 wire culture if we hope to regain ground on our innovation reputation.

The research took, as its starting point, the view that innovation doesn’t “just happen”. Instead, innovation is about systematised value creation. It has to be nurtured through a number of stages, of which innovation is the end point. Other waypoints include curiosity, imagination, and creativity. …


Image for post
Image for post

When art historians talk about the masters of Renaissance art — da Vinci, Michaelangelo, Raphael — many of them are mentioned because of the way they were able to use their imagination to advance art and society. They saw the world in different ways and could present those new perspectives in a way that the rest of the world could interpret.

Or perhaps, for many of us, they come to mind because they were also ninja turtles…

These artists had a contemporary who trained and painted alongside them, commissioned by the same famous patrons, working in the same famous churches, but just not quite like them. …


The Work In Progress (WIP) meeting is an almost ubiquitous part of corporate life. They are also a huge waste of time.

Image for post
Image for post

The internet is filled with articles extolling ways to run WIP meetings that “actually work”, how to make them “awesome”, how to make them drive performance, and so on. These articles are all about restructuring meetings to make them effective. There are very few that focus on any real, successful, outcomes from WIP meetings.

I recently took on the task of redeveloping Redvespa’s weekly WIP meeting in to something more effective. The starting point was to determine the point of the meeting, and it was immediately obvious that getting updates on work was no longer at the centre of organisational needs. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo from Shapelined on Unsplash

In the 2017–18 A League football competition, Sydney FC were the runaway leaders at the end of the league phase. Leading from Round 7, they lost just three times on their way to securing a home semi-final against the Melbourne Victory. The two teams have combined through their history to form a rivalry known as The Big Blue, their clashes a highlight of the Australian sporting calendar.

In the semi-final, the underdog Melbourne side took a 2–1 lead into added time as they looked to secure their first derby win in two years and atone for a Grand Final loss against the same opponents the year before. It was then, in the 95th minute, that Victory midfielder, Terry Antonis, steered the ball into his own net. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo: Susie Butler via Wikimedia

In January 2019, the social media world was captivated by the gymnastics routine of 21-year old American, Katelyn Ohashi. Competing for the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Ohashi leapt, flipped, and turned in a high-energy performance that gained perfect 10 scores from the judges. However, it wasn’t simply the scores that led Ohashi’s routine to hit the headlines.

Ohashi’s journey to that performance, and the follow-ups that kept her in the spotlight, was filled with challenge and opportunity, success and failure. In 2013, she won the American Cup, defeating future Olympic Gold Medalist, Simone Biles in the process. A year later she was seriously injured before, having returned to competition, fracturing her sternum in 2016. …


3 Lessons to Help Your Company Adopt a Conscious Culture and Build a Better World

Image for post
Image for post

The desire at Redvespa to become a Certified B Corporation came from a philosophy that has been part of the company since its founding in 2003. Informal and identified as simply being “part of us,” that philosophy defines Redvespa as being in Business for Good.

Now, through the process of gaining B Corp certification in July 2018, Business for Good is more than just a philosophy. It is an integral part of Redvespa’s way of working and a key driver in our strategy. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jonathan Kemper on Unsplash

“Of making apps there is no end.”

“The abundance of technology is a distraction.”

“Is there anywhere on Earth exempt from these swarms of new smartphones?”

In our “always on” world, it is very easy to feel like there is no escape from technology and the alerts, information, and expectations it places on us. Information overload bears down on us with every Facebook post, shared article, and email.

It feels like a very modern problem, one driven by those technological marvels we carry in our pockets. However, information overload has existed in almost every society in some way, with books in all their forms driving information anxiety for decades. …


Image for post
Image for post

In November 2018, I joined a familiar group of people to see English singer-songwriter, Frank Turner, play at San Fran in Wellington, New Zealand. I say familiar because I could see something of myself in each of them. We were all aging quicker than we’d care to admit. We were all, at one point, comfortable near the mosh pit but now found safety on its fringes. We all wore black t-shirts and drank craft beer.

The level of familiarity extended to the man we were there to see: Turner is a mid-30s, former-hardcore rocker who, these days, is punk through philosophy more than through practice — although he is not too far removed to have stopped stage diving. …


Image for post
Image for post

Orson Welles, in full cigar-chewing glory, narrates the 1972 documentary Future Shock, his imposing frame and deep voice introducing the film as an airport travelator carries him toward the camera. Welles appears contemplative throughout the film, portraying a weariness reflecting the documentary’s message that rapid change is alienating and distressing society. Although he is known as one of the greatest directors of all time, the message Welles delivers is not his own.

Instead, the concept of ‘Future Shock’ comes from someone most New Zealanders only known of through the Dance Exponents and their 1982 song, Victoria.

She’s up in time to watch the soap opera
Reads cosmopolitan and Alvin Toffler
Meeting in the places that she’s never been to
She’s got a mind but it’s the clothes they see…


Image for post
Image for post
Marie Curie at her Laboratory Table via Wikimedia Commons

In 1895, with her marriage to Pierre Curie nearing, a family member offered to buy Marie Sklodowska a wedding dress. Her response, as reported in the decades since, was,

If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark, so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory.

When it came to her wedding day attire, Marie’s primary concern was its application to her work. By 1895, Marie had already graduated from the Faculty of Sciences at Sorbonne Université with degrees in Physics and Mathematics. Such was the dedication to her studies, Marie was known to collapse from exhaustion. …

About

Jamie Bell

Exploring the world through stories of the head, the heart, & history. I’m totally curious, definitely passionate, pretty empathetic, & hopefully kind.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store