Beauty in the organic nature of the analog photography

Have you ever wondered what kind of images do people like? what qualities do people look for in photography? Well, for most, image is just an image — we like and accept whatever we are shown — there is nothing wrong about that — majority of magazines, blogs and other online resources focus on one very particular way of doing photography, which I believe is strongly reflects on the tools photographers have now at hand. Digital cameras able to shoot hundreds of images on a single memory card, processing and sorting them is easy thanks to applications such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Needless to say further editing and photomanipulation is not a big deal either. So what is the consequence — why should we care? The photographic mainstream is all about perfection — everyone needs to have perfect, glowing skin, everyone needs to look thin and fit, landscapes have to be super saturated with colour, interiors spotless with no mess at all, managers have to be happy and office workers need to show a sense of accomplishment, meals have to look so appetizing it is almost impossible. Nothing dies and the world is filled with rainbows and unicorns. Now think about it. Is it only what we want to accomplish in photography or does it affect our ways of living? Photography is a powerful tool, we look at it all the time and rarely realise the impact it has.

I need everyone to erase what they know about photography trends these days and look at four pictures by two photographers that shaped my early photographic practice Daido Moriyama — Japanese artist, the author of black and white images below

by Daido Moriyama
by Daido Moriyama

and William Eggleston — American classic documentalist, father of taking photographs of everything and nothing.

by William Eggleston
by William Eggleston

By today’s standards nothing is right — the colours are off, the images are not smooth or sharp. The angles are not straight. Everything is messed up. But somehow there is something that attracts us to explore them — they are so natural and rich they almost feel like our own memories activating all other senses — smell, hearing, touch, we are not only looking at pictures but reliving the scene as if we are there. I doubt that you can do that with polished off digital image — looking at it you can only aspire to be something, but this aspiration is not in the heart of photography.

Shoot film. It will reward you, and if you can’t take an extra second to think about the image before you take it and don’t look for the beauty that is not there.