Often times we want to test an entire process end-to-end that includes a process that hits a webhook on completion. Let’s do that with Flagpole and ngrok.

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What problem are we solving?

Let’s say you make a call to an API that creates a video clip from a live stream. It accepts a time-in and time-out for the clip, along with a title for the new clip that it will create. Ultimately, it will have a URL for the newly generated clip.

That API will most likely immediately respond with “202 Accepted,” which your request was accepted, but there is more work to be done. This then kicks off a job to create various HLS video files and push them into a storage bucket. …


Joshua Berrien Lastinger decided that his idea of a garden paradise was the wild lake country of southern Highlands County.

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Lastinger Family Reunion from 1904. Joshua is left of center with the bow tie. (https://raycityhistory.wordpress.com/)

One of the few surviving photos of Lake Placid’s first white settler, Joshua Berrien Lastinger, comes from a 1904 family reunion. The children of William Lastinger and their families — over a hundred grandchildren and great-grandchildren — gathered for a colossal feast on their father’s posthumous 100th birthday. Many had not seen each other for years, traveling back to South-Central Georgia where it all began.

William, the family patriarch, acquired 2,225 acres of land northeast of Valdosta. With the purchase, the family became the largest landholder within several counties. The estate included a large lake with a grain mill. The clan, which first immigrated from Germany in 1740, added a sawmill, and the area became known as Lastinger’s Mills. …


Too often we fail to think about where we want to go in our career and in life. This is a huge mistake.

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Royalty-free photo by Flickr via Pexels

Can you imagine starting a software project without any requirements or specifications? Not only no designs, but no clearly-defined problem it is trying to solve nor KPI that it is trying to drive?

That application most likely would be doomed to failure. The development team on the project would flop around aimlessly trying to complete it with absolutely no definition of “done” nor way to measure its success.

And yet we do this with our lives and careers all of the time.

As a sports journalist for many years, I interviewed countless elite athletes. Fresh off of some big accomplishment, you often have them reflect on their season or wider career. Time after time they talked about having envisioned this day for months or even years. Very often they had their goals plastered in the form of Post-It notes all over their homes: “State Champion,” “4:15 Mile” or “Break Team Record” it might say. …


The comedians settled in Seminole County after retiring from a 15-year career, thrilling audiences around the country.

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It’s not every day that genuine celebrities move to town! The citizens of tiny Altamonte Springs were delighted when the famous “Lyman Twins” decided to retire a mile west of their fern-cultivating village in 1911.

During the height of the Vaudeville era, Howard and Herbert Lyman were headliners that packed theaters for up to a dozen performances in some large cities. Their gags became legendary and inspired many that came after them, including the Marx Brothers.

Howard and Herbert were originally from Michigan and started performing locally in Grand Haven at 17 years old in 1895. …


You may not know you have picked it up until you get home and examine yourself closely. Time to pick off the burs.

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With folded hands, I confess my sins.

Six years ago, we moved from Apopka to Winter Springs. In doing so, we went from living in a city where white (non-Hispanic) people are the minority to a predominantly white suburb where only 5% are black — about a third of the Florida average. We did so to be closer to my office, in-laws, and church. But I’d be lying if I said there wasn’t a bit of classism in that decision as well: better schools, less crime, and nicer homes.

That’s not the sin I’m here to confess though. …


I wrote this originally as a devotion for my home church, Sanlando United Methodist.

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Hey Christians! Why do y’all act like you’re too good for some people? Let’s say a rich dude double-parks his shiny-new Lexus. A few seconds later, an old beat-up station wagon squeals into the church parking lot. You trip over each other to impress the rich dude: “Welcome to our church! The sanctuary is this way. You can sit with me.” But you ignore the poor family or just say, “Oh… there’s some seats for you on the side.”

Seriously? Do you know how prejudice that makes you? You pick and choose who you think has more value. God says the poor and oppressed will be the richest in faith, but you don’t honestly care about the underprivileged. How ironic, because it’s the rich that are exploiting both of you! Scripture says: “Love your neighbor as you love yourself.” If you do that, God smiles at you. But if you think you’re better than certain people, you are not being like Jesus. Like Bill and Ted told us in the 90s: “Be excellent to each other!” …


Griffin Farm is the crown jewel of Lake Mary’s midtown. Until recently, it was the lifelong home of Lillian Humphrey Griffin.

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Griffin Farm, last cattle ranch hold out in the core of Lake Mary, is seen here in 2011 on Google Street View.

Two nights ago, I was picking up dinner at ZaZa’s in the convenient new live-shop-work hotspot in Lake Mary. Noticing the name “Griffin Farm” on the upscale town center, it got me wondering… what’s the story behind it?

Anyone living near Lake Mary probably remembers the property. Prior to 2018, it was the island of pasture between the I-4 commercial district and Lake Mary’s revitalized downtown Central Park.

The green space was a peculiar breath of fresh air (or perhaps just a whiff of manure) at the busy intersection of Lake Mary Boulevard and Longwood-Lake Mary Road. The bovine that grazed at Griffin Farm seemed unaware that their rural outpost was the last hold out. …


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Edge-side scripting is the future of CDNs and serverless. But, for companies wanting to be multi-cloud, can we develop shared code that can be deployed to multiple clouds?

My readers know by now that I am a big proponent of edge-side scripting logic. It is fantastic to run as much logic as you can as close as you can (physically and network topographically) to your user. Being able to customize the behavior of your CDN is also a huge value-add. This is the next logical evolution of the serverless movement.

All that being said, at some point in your growth toward scale, super high reliability, and failover you want to be able to span multiple cloud and CDN providers. …


Hidden beneath suburban Winter Springs is the old village of Wagner and its once infamous dead man’s curve.

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This little remnant of the old highway still exists between Winter Springs High School and 434.

It’s hard to explain just how different Winter Springs looked just 30 years ago. Today it’s a bustling suburb interspersed by four-lane highways and swarming with sprawl. Three-story apartment complexes and maze-like neighborhoods are devouring the remaining patches of natural habitat.

At the start of the nineties, however, Winter Springs was very much a rural agricultural village. That is not to say no one lived here. The western section of “Old North Orlando” dates back to 1958 and, on the east side of town, the original core of Tuscawilla was built in the seventies.

But in between was… mostly nothing.

Heading east from Longwood, State Road 434 was a narrow two-lane country road. Continuing past the 419 intersection, homes quickly evaporated into forest, swamp, cow pasture, farms, and orange groves. There was no Central Winds Park nor Winter Springs Town Center. No Winter Springs High School nor Indian Trails Middle. …


What started as two women making tropical treats for their friends was made stalwart by the Taylor and Webb families.

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Sun Dial Citrus Candies factory in 1930

As a kid growing up in South-Central Florida there was always great promise venturing north on US 27 toward the big city of Orlando. What wonders there were in the city full of theme parks and dinner shows! Passing Haines City and inching closer to I-4, you always knew your destination was nearby when the huge signed beaconed: “Citrus Candy Factory: Visitors Welcome” and “Goats Milk Fudge!”

Mom, dad, can we please stop??!! That plea often didn’t take a ton of convincing. There were wonderful, unique pleasures inside.

The business dates back to mid-to-late 1920s. Kathryn Stillman and Maude Blodgett — two women from Devlan Lake, Wisconsin — lived together and wintered in Davenport, Florida. Being enamored by the wide variety of citrus they found in the Sunshine State, the two developed their own recipes to transform the fruits (peels and all) into sweet delicacies. The challenge they conquered was how to remove the tartness — a secret they held close to the vest for many years! …

About

Jason Byrne

Entrepreneur, developer, historian, journalist, Christian, family man, and track & field fan. VP, Engineering @ FloSports. Founder of MileSplit.

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