This blog summarizes our CSCW 2019 paper “Intergroup Contact in the Wild: Characterizing Language Differences between Intergroup and Single-group Members in NBA-related Discussion Forums.” by Jason Shuo Zhang, Chenhao Tan, and Qin Lv.

In recent years, there is growing concern about polarization and tribalism in world politics. People can identify themselves as members of a social “tribe” and develop hostile attitudes towards other groups. In the era of social media, platforms, such as Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook, may have led American Republicans and Democrats to further segregate themselves.

In order to reduce prejudice and build bridges between people with different ideologies, a proposed strategy is to take people out of their “echo-chambers” and encourage intergroup contact with opposing groups. This strategy has been proven to be effective in many offline settings as interpersonal interactions can challenge the stereotypes people may have with each other. Some service providers in Silicon Valley are experimenting with this strategy on their social media platforms. In an interview with The Washington Post in 2018, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said his company was testing features that would promote alternative viewpoints in Twitter’s timeline to address misinformation and reduce “echo chambers.” …


This blog summarizes our CSCW 2019 paper “Intergroup Contact in the Wild: Characterizing Language Differences between Intergroup and Single-group Members in NBA-related Discussion Forums.” by Jason Shuo Zhang, Chenhao Tan, and Qin Lv.

In recent years, there is growing concern about polarization and tribalism in world politics. People can identify themselves as members of a social “tribe” and develop hostile attitudes towards other groups. In the era of social media, platforms, such as Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook, may have led American Republicans and Democrats to further segregate themselves.

In order to reduce prejudice and build bridges between people with different ideologies, a proposed strategy is to take people out of their “echo-chambers” and encourage intergroup contact with opposing groups. This strategy has been proven to be effective in many offline settings as interpersonal interactions can challenge the stereotypes people may have with each other. Some service providers in Silicon Valley are experimenting with this strategy on their social media platforms. In an interview with The Washington Post in 2018, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said his company was testing features that would promote alternative viewpoints in Twitter’s timeline to address misinformation and reduce “echo chambers.” …


This blog summarizes our CSCW 2018 paper “‘This is Why We Play’: Characterizing Online Fan Communities of the NBA Teams” by Jason Shuo Zhang, Chenhao Tan, and Qin Lv.

(Cross-posted to Towards Data Science)

Many online communities do not only exist in the virtual world but are also deeply embedded in the offline context and attract people with similar offline interest. It is an important research question to understand to what extent and how online communities relate to the offline context.

Professional sports provides an interesting case because these online fan communities, in a way, only exist as a result of offline sports teams and games. Such connections also highlight the necessity to combine multiple data sources to understand how fan behavior in online social media correlates with on-going events of the topic of their interests. …

About

Jason Shuo Zhang

Ph.D. student @CUBoulder & interested in computational social science, mobile computing, and data science. http://jasondarkblue.com