Cross-posted on Monica Ramirez’s Medium page.

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We recently learned of the conversation on Twitter about the wage gap for Black Women and Latinas. It’s not often that the issue of equal pay breaks through and we are grateful to Gina Rodriguez, Gabrielle Union, Ellen Pompeo and Emma Roberts for their conversation — it was honest, funny, tough and a reminder that the pay gap shows up in every setting. As longtime equal pay advocates, we are writing to add some key facts to the conversation.

During the discussion, Gina Rodriguez named that the wage gap is widest for Latinas — a fact that is likely front of mind given that we just marked Latina Equal Pay Day in November. In 2017, women working full time year-round were typically paid 80 cents for every dollar paid men. Asian women were typically paid 85 cents, White women were paid 77 cents, Black women were paid 61 cents, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander women were paid 59 cents, American Indian and Alaska Native women were paid 57 cents and Latinas were paid 53 cents for every dollar paid white, non-Hispanic men. These statistics are based on median wages for full time workers in all fields, but no matter the industry, job, or location, a wage gap persists between women and men. The gap is worse, on average, for women of color. …


By: Joi Chaney & Noreen Farrell

This blog is being cross-posted on Joi Chaney’s Medium Page, Noreen Farrell’s Medium Page, and the United State of Women’s Forbes Page.

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As the nation reflects on the first year since the #MeToo movement went viral, and its broader implications for women’s equality, the story of Janet Aviles comes to mind. Janet worked at a government contractor shipyard in Norfolk, Virginia. In her workplace, management directed women to “shake it” as they walked by and laughed at sexually graphic depictions of them by male coworkers. …


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For the last week or more since the allegations of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh were made public, the national discourse has focused rightly on the needs of his accusers, who deserve to be heard; on the needs of the Judge, who deserves to defend himself; on the needs of Senators, who have terribly mismanaged this process; and on the needs of the President, who continues to exemplify the failures of leadership. …

About

Joi Olivia Chaney

Women’s & Civil Rights Advocate