When Will Black Be Trendy?

When will black be trendy?

I grew up, and currently am, in a predominantly caucasian society. I grew up with white friends, and I have had mostly white co-workers. This isn’t a conversation about population, demographic percentages, or social class. This is a conversation coming from a 25-year-old African American that grew up and dwells around middle to upper-class Caucasians about how Blacks are perceived.

While growing up in the circles I did, I developed the awareness that I wasn’t like most of my friends. My skin was darker and I was considerably more “ashy”. I talked and dressed like most of them, but I wasn’t “all the way” like them.

My skin was darker and I was considerably more “ashy”. I talked and dressed like most of them, but I wasn’t “all the way” like them.”

There are a lot of conversations happening about the African American population right now. From BLM to everything surrounding our President Elect Donald J Trump. Some of these conversations I agree with and some I don’t. I do want to say that I am not here looking for sympathy or a handout. I want to bring awareness.

I think America is in a better state than we have ever seen it be before. I am able to walk down the street freely, have great career opportunities, and even have white friends. Is it like this everywhere in America? No, but we are making progress.

Behind the blatant racism and prejudice there is something else that I have experienced that most people do not seem to be talking about — black is not trendy.

Behind the blatant racism and prejudice there is something else that I have experienced that most people do not seem to be talking about — black is not trendy.”

I grew up and was surrounded by my white friends dressing a certain why. I saw ads on tv and the internet of … mostly white people, and when my friends typically thought of black communities it was typically either a part of town that was stricken with blight or poverty or somewhere overseas like Haiti or Kenya. I don’t believe they were blatantly developing negative opinions about my people, but I do think that subliminally opinions were being placed in their minds. Opinions were certainly being placed in mine.

I don’t believe they were blatantly developing negative opinions about my people, but I do think that subliminally opinions were being placed in their minds. Opinions were certainly being placed in mine.”

White people with “white” lives were sought after. The most popular kids in school were white. The girls typically paid more attention to the white guys. The only place that I could lay my claim was on the football field. I was not a second class citizen by any means, but black certainly wasn’t trendy.

Not only do I look forward to an America that is completely free of racism (though it will never be completely free), I look forward to an America that shows blacks in the same light as whites. I look forward to a day when I can confidently say that black is trendy.

White people with “white” lives were sought after. The most popular kids in school were white. The girls typically paid more attention to the white guys. The only place that I could lay my claim was on the football field.”

I want my children to be able to grow up and know that they are not different than their friends. I don’t want them to be afraid to stop at a gas station in rural areas on road trips because they are afraid they are going to be treated differently. I don’t want my kids to feel like they can’t ask the prettiest girl at school out on a date because their skin is darker.

For those of you that think these issues are no longer relevant today — they are. I remember hearing from a friend that another friend of ours didn’t believe in interracial relationships. These ideologies still lay claim in our society today. Those words still ring through my head.

Jarod Dickson

www.mradio.wordpress.com

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