How To Use Your Day Job To Fund Your Dream Job

What to do with your entrepreneurial energy when you are at your day job

If you work for a company but ideally want to work for yourself, you will have moments when your entrepreneurial self will show up at your job.

You will be amazing! You will have grandiose ideas about how to change the company, improve processes, increase revenue, and revamp your entire department.

You’ll see yourself having lunch with the boss, forming the perfect committee, and making those much-needed improvements that you’re certain will make the company skyrocket.

BUT the truth is, that’s not how your company sees it, nor is it how they see you! Let’s face it. Your company hired you to do a job and pays you to do that job.

So, what do you do with all of your entrepreneurial energy when you’re at your day job?

Key Note To Make: Save it, and use it for yourself!

This will go against the grain of your entrepreneurial self, not to mention your work ethic, but you must resist the urge of giving everything to someone who is only paying you for a portion.

You have that entrepreneurial energy in you because you were designed for more. You were born to be on your own…you’re just not quite there yet.

If you were not designed for more, you would be content with where you’re at. Remember:

“Contentment isn’t curious. Satisfaction does not seek.” — Jeff Crume

Stop thinking you get paid by the hour

You don’t get paid by the hour — if that were the case, you could just stay at home and have your paycheck mailed to you.

You get paid for the value you put in that hour. And not your personal value; but the value the company puts on your position and contribution.

If the company see’s your position as a $15 p/hr position, you should be giving $15 p/hr worth of value and not a penny more!

If you give $25 p/hr of value in a $15 p/hr position, only one person is benefiting, and it’s not you!

Exception: Working your way up the corporate ladder

Now, if your goal is to work your way up the corporate ladder and make a name for yourself in that company, then by all means you should give as much as you can and more to your job.

But if you are using your day job to fund your dream job and you give your day job all you’ve got, you will never have anything left to build your dream job.

Be efficient but not gullible.

Be efficient on your job, but not gullible. Be very cautious about investing your entrepreneurial ideas and energy into a company that only sees you as an employee.

If you try and act like an entrepreneur when you were hired to be an employee, you are going to confuse your boss, and eventually put your job at risk.

Solution? Give them what they want.

This will be the hardest test for you as you transition from employee to self employed, but one you must pass before you can ultimately resign from your 9–5.

[Hold onto your seat, now. This is going to be rough.]

You're going to have to be ok with “using” your employer to build your own business.

A nicer way to think of it is “leveraging” your employer to grow your business. Utilize what you learn and earn on your 9–5 to help you grow your 5–9. The key is to meet expectation on your 9–5, exceed expectation on your 5–9. It’s fundamental to transitioning from employee to self-employed.

Employee mentality puts the company first. Self-employed mentality puts yourself first. If you don’t put yourself first, no one else will either.

Are They Going To Change?

You must keep asking yourself, every time you feel the need to go above and beyond at your day job, is this going to change anything? 99% of the time the answer is no!

Your devotion and dedication might make you feel better about yourself at the moment, because you finally feel like you are making a contribution rather than just completing a task, but more than likely you’re going to send a mixed message to your employer and possibly make a lot of your fellow employees uncomfortable too.

The truth is, no one wants the boat to rock. “Good employees” don’t like the boat rocked. If you keep rocking it, you may find yourself pushed overboard.

Solution?

Use your employee energy for your day job, and your entrepreneurial energy for dream job. Another way to put it — work harder on yourself than you do on your job. Its one of the fundamentals of wealth and happiness, and the key to using your day job to fund your dream job.