I am sharing another recent design challenge I was given for a possible role. Below is the challenge, and the guidelines given. I had about a week to complete and deliver my solution.

Title: add a 3rd option to our subscription page

Guidelines: Our current subscription page is one of our most important pages because this is the point of conversion. We are going to be introducing a 3rd plan with an even more limited feature set. The challenge we’re having is figuring out a way to add that 3rd option to our subscription page in the product. …


I am sharing a recent design challenge I was given for a possible role. Below is the challenge, and the guidelines given. I had 3 days to complete and deliver my solution.

Title: Design an ATM for Kids

Guidelines: This challenge is deliberately open ended — there is no minimum or maximum. Feel free to tackle any aspect of a potential solution. Keep a record of your process to share with us. If you have questions along the way, please record those questions, then assume an answer for the sake of moving forward in the challenge.

I specifically wanted to…


We designers are trying our damndest to kill the web. And we’ve been doing it since web design became a thing. Think about this: the responsive web is something we had to make because we broke it. The web, in its very own nature, is responsive. Try it out: disable the CSS & JavaScript in your browser and see. Albeit it may not have been the most attractive to consume, but when it was born, the web adapted naturally to browsers of all sizes and shapes.

But then us designers decided this was silly, and ugly, and not good enough…


Or, how stable always wins.

Continuing in our updates to mobile web traffic for Tradesy.com, along with our navigation updates, we killed modals* for mobile visitors. Again, as many web sites often do, we used (& still do) modals a lot. Like A LOT. And, for desktop browsers, this isn’t the worst UI pattern in the world, nor is it the best. But for our mobile web visitors, it was just a very awkward, unpleasant experience.

High bounce and exit rates for mobile visitors told us this was partly to blame on the modal experience we were delivering to our visitors. Whenever a visitor would…


Or, how obvious always wins.

Everyone knows that mobile traffic has surpassed desktop traffic; especially when it comes to eCommerce. In 2015, Tradesy.com’s traffic experienced the same pivotal moment in April. Our current website was built like many other websites: responsive to work across all browser widths. This also meant that, like many other sites, we had a 🍔 menu. There have been many studies done on whether the hamburger menu works or not, but internally, we knew the hamburger was a bad solution to a complicated problem.

Less than stellar conversion rates and fewer than desired page views were some of the signifiers to…


The title kinda says it all: Don’t lose focus. Either of what you want your users to do on your site, but more specifically, don’t lose the oft forgotten pseudo styling for interactions. CSS resets are great, but often times you’ll reset default browser styling that, unless properly redefined, is critical to helping your users when interacting with any type of website.

Even in 2015, these necessary actions are understyled, or not styled at all. Please, stop screwing up your users experiences.

:hover

This is the least often of the offenders, but it is something that is definitely taken for granted…


We designers are trying our damndest to kill the web. And we’ve been doing it since web design became a thing. Think about this: the responsive web is something we had to make because we broke it. The web, in its very own nature, is responsive. Try it out: disable the CSS & JavaScript in your browser and see. Albeit it may not have been the most attractive to consume, but when it was born, the web adapted naturally to browsers of all sizes and shapes.

But then us designers decided this was silly, and ugly, and not good enough…


We’ve been doing it wrong since the beginning. And no, I’m not referring to life in general, though the argument could be made for that. I’m more referring to what we deliver to clients in the design phase, and what they end up getting in the prototyping / development / deliverable phases. Clients typically don’t have the experience or requirement to know the difference between a static JPEG / PNG and what they use everyday on the web. …

Jeff Doan

Lover of minivans, web designer and front-end tinkerer; product designer @simplepractice. A rad dad with 15% less mohawk now.

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