and what a state we’re still in where I describe expected and consistent functionality as a moment of joy.
I’m a huge fan of https://www.jetbrains.com/’s
Iain Connor
3

You’ve hit the nail on the head. When we try to innovate and do new things—or quickly add new functionality to a product with no regard to the patterns that exist—we tend to get tunnel vision. Everything makes sense because we have the context of making that decision. But when you step back and see how it fits into the whole you realize: it doesn’t. So then those gaps come in, such as those in Slack, where things don’t act how we expect them to. I wonder how many of those gaps exist because they made features in isolation. The very basics of the app (sending and reading messages) works great, but features like dropping in content seem to have been designed and developed apart from the rest of it.

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