Detailed guidelines for struggling PR people

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General rules for writing a press release

The one thing you have to always keep in mind while writing a press release is that you do it for a media outlet, not just your company. Your goal is to make them interested and publish it.

A perfect press release looks like a decently written news piece and needs no editorial involvement from the media in question. They just have to read it and say: “We have everything we need here, what a wonderful person must have written this.”

Keeping that in mind, here are some general guidelines:


An attempt at honest perspective from a native ad producer

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As someone who makes a living from creating native ads and marketing strategies, I should be tempted to say that there’s no better way to promote one’s products or services. However, this would be a lie. Each problem in the world must have several solutions, ranging from best to worst, and it so happens that in the world of marketing, native advertising isn’t always the best option.

In this post, I’ll take a look at the most common instances when you shouldn’t go for native advertising, and will offer you a more reasonable alternative.

When native ads will not work


How to identify the problems with your text and make everything right

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Writing a bad text isn’t a drama. It happened to anyone, and most likely more than just once in a lifetime. Even seasoned professionals make mistakes.

In this post, I’ll tell you what can be wrong with your text and how to make it right. But if you expect it to be a short story, I’m really sorry.

The Three-Level Concept

It doesn’t really matter what your text actually is. There are three levels of fallacy that can haunt any text, from a tweet to a multi-volume novel. Here they are:


A typical project in the life of a producer

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The most popular kind of branded content this year in our company has been so-called special project. A special project is a special sponsored page within an online publication that may feature a long read, an in-browser game, a quiz or literally any other multimedia format. To some extent, it is arguably the pinnacle of native advertising online.

Publications launch those special projects when the sponsor wishes to have something more than just a paid-for article. The special project’s greater purpose is to educate or entertain the reader while dropping hints as to what a great guy the sponsor is…


Viral marketing techniques for the postmodernist era

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Viral advertising is probably the purest form of native advertising: some people don’t even realize the things they share on their own free will is actually an ad. They believe it’s a meme with some pop culture references or just some crazy stuff.

Of course, even the most seasoned native ad expert will hardly ever give a 100% guarantee that the ad will go viral, and that’s probably the biggest catch found in this area. Trying yourself at viral advertising is always a bit risky. But it actually pays in the end.

So, how can one create a viral advertisement…


How to deal with unpleasant comments

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If you work with texts or visual designs in any capacity, you know how it feels. You spend days if not weeks working on something and then your customer starts piling up comments on your work. You watch the comments multiplying like bacteria in a Petri dish, you even mute the notifications, and when it’s all over you feel like they trampled on your work, your effort, and even your dignity.

I’ve been there hundreds if not thousands of times, just like you. And as I grew more experienced I found myself growing more cynical as well. And, frankly, cynicism…


How to avoid development hell in advance, put an end to counterproductive communication, and deal with ongoing chaos

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It’s safe to bet that each company or freelancer has met this breed of customers at least a few times over their career. Whether it was a seemingly easy task that soon got inflated like Betelgeuse or a major project that got dead stuck in what is known as development hell, the circumstances seem almost identical: things don’t get green light, new tasks pop up everywhere, and the customer is very unhappy.

This feature hopefully will shed some light on that matter and give some answers to the accursed question everyone asks themselves in this sort of situation: god, why?

Signs of a client from hell


How to make your own media without money and marketing (spoiler alert: you can’t)

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A year ago we decided to launch a media outlet called lawless.tech. Six months ago we had to abandon it for other commitments. This is the story of what happened in between.

We wrote about regulations imposed on up-and-coming technologies varying from space exploration to blockchain startups. Thanks to that, we got acquainted with lots of very interesting people involved in that area. Our articles were viewed more than 200 thousand times, which was pretty decent for an experimental low-profile project. We received some inspiring comments like:

I never thought I’d ever see real journalism again.”

In many respects, it…


Why nobody reads your ads

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After reading some of my posts, one might get an impression that our company consists solely of haters of direct advertising. Well, that is just not true.

Direct advertising is a very useful thing, and sometimes it can be a literal masterpiece as proven by certain Super Bowl commercials. The thing is that everything has its rightful place, and the same thing may work great or be completely useless under different circumstances.

Some of our past customers wanted us to do direct advertising. More accurately, they wanted us to create and disseminate marketing texts that looked like extatic prayers to…


What makes up a good native ad and what makes it awful

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Over the past entries, I’ve mentioned native ads countless times. Actually, I could count it but I don’t really want to, and it doesn’t matter much anyway. In any case, all those posts depicted native ads as something good, effective, and beneficial for both audiences and sponsors. And it might have been true, had we lived in a magical world full of ponies, rainbows, and kawaii anime girls.

The sad truth is that native ads can also suck. …

Jenny Aysgarth

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