p. 83 #3 Homework Assignment

Please view the article link to see the original content, but here are my recommendations on correcting the article in a digital media sense.

I would hyperlink the words:crime, teenage life in Australia, Wirpanda Foundation, and mentor.

For the crime link I would find the stats for committed crimes in Australia that result in prison. For the link teenage life in Australia I would find pictures of the typical things teenagers do in Australia. Wirpanda Foundation would have a link to their website just incase if the reader wanted to learn more information about this foundation. Lastly I would hyperlink the word mentor and have a link to a website of how to be an effective mentor to a tennager.

I would list off the statistics instead of having them listed in the paragraph form.

ex: “It’s a common pattern. Indigenous children in WA are 53 times more likely to go to jail than non-Indigenous children. At any given time, one in 77 Aboriginal boys in WA is in detention.

It’s higher than the black imprisonment rate in the United States: Indigenous children in WA are imprisoned at a rate of 78 for every 10,000, compared with 52 for every 10,000 African-American children”

rather….

  • Indigenous children in WA are 53 times more likely to go to jail than non-Indigenous children.
  • One in 77 Aboriginal boys in WA is in detention
  • Indigenous children in WA are imprisoned at a rate of 78 for every 10,000, compared with 52 for every 10,000 African-American children

For the How To Section: I would show (How to be an effective mentor to teenagers)

10 Tips For Building a Mentoring Relationship

As I gave you a list of 10 requests from teenagers it seems like good symmetry to give you a list of 10 tips to help you in building your relationship.

This list is based a resource from the Youth Mentoring Network and gives some basic guidelines for building a mentoring relationship.

  1. Have realistic goals and expectations — focus on the teenager and their overall development. Your early efforts should just be on developing rapport.
  2. Have fun together — play games, go bowling, go to the movies, etc.
  3. Give the teen you’re mentoring a voice and choice in deciding on activities — it demonstrates your trust, and builds skills and confidence.
  4. Be Positive — be encouraging and offer concrete assistance.
  5. Let the teen you are mentoring have significant control over what the two of you talk about -and how you talk about it — don’t push, be sensitive and aware of different communication styles.
  6. Listen — ‘Just Listening’ will develop trust — not criticising or judging.
  7. Respect the trust the teenager places in you — show them that you understand and are committed to the relationship.
  8. Be a friend — don’t be a parent or authority figure.
  9. Remember YOU are responsible for building the relationship — take responsibility for making and maintaining contact and don’t expect too much feedback from the teenager.
  10. Remember that your relationship is with the teen and not the teen’s parents — keep your relationship with them cordial but distant. (This point is not always valid, especially if you are a friend of the family or a relative. Make sure parents know who you are, at least enough to trust you.

An addition would be to add a small video clip to this website explaining how criminal behaviors can alter your life drastically. Interviews with prisoners could be shown. Also a list of activities teenagers could do to occupy time and stay connected instead of criminal behaviors.

Like what you read? Give Jenny Rakshys a round of applause.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.