Time Travel Diary — Part 1

Jeremy Raglin
Nov 28, 2017 · 4 min read

“Your dad looks like John Wilkes Booth”.

This was something that I heard a lot growing up whenever my friends came over to study. Their comments never registered with me until I read my dad’s time travel journal.

Some dads work on cars, my dad traveled through time, and by my 18th birthday I was traveling back to 1865 to save him from dying as John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln, on April 15th,1865.

My Dad became Booth shortly before my 10th birthday, I remember it vividly because within one month he grew out the Booth mustache and shortly after he was gone.

My mom told me that dad was a deadbeat who walked out on us, but I knew better, and only on my 18th birthday did I learn the truth.

Dads time travel journal arrived via courier in a big box. I knew the package was from him because I recognized his writing on the package.

I signed for it, took the package up to my to my room, and opened it.

Inside the package were his journal, two thumb drives, a picture of dad and I on my 5th birthday, and an old brass key.

I remembered him writing in the journal a lot before he left. Mom always begged him to not bring his work home with him but when she wasn’t around, he lived in the journal, and now I could finally see why.

Dad worked for a government organization called TCAP; it was created by the United Nations in the 1960s to stop rogue governments from changing the timeline.

TCAP stayed loyal to protecting the timeline until the 1990’s when it started making subtle changes to the timeline for money.

A shah in Iraq paid TCAP to wipe out his ex-wife’s parents so she wouldn’t be born.

The President of Cuba hired TCAP to eliminate Castro’s enemies so the revolution could start 10 years earlier.

TCAP began to meddle with the United States timeline when they killed President Garfield and after that, they made many more changes to history.

The final pages in dad’s journal ended with him writing about his time travel cover as John Wilkes Booth, for his last mission, which somehow ended with him being the killer of President Lincoln.

Was he a killer or a “patsy” like Lee Harvey Oswald famously claimed he was?

From my dad’s journal I could see that he was passionate about his job and considered himself to be a steward of history so I felt compelled to find out what happened to him.

I plugged in one of his thumb drives into my laptop and started to learn what really happened to him.

The drive had one video on it, I clicked play and didn’t see a video of my dad like I expected, it was a grainy cell phone video of a dark-haired man dressed in 1800’s style clothing, giving another man who I realized was Robert E Lee, an envelope filled with cash.

Was Lee responsible for Lincoln’s death?

This video would have a lot of historians very angry.

I plugged in a second flash drive and watched the video of my dad that I had hoped for.

The video was shot in the house that I lived in for the first 10 years of my life in Willows California.

My mom and I moved after dad left and I never stopped missing him or that house.

Dad sat down on the couch in the living room and held up a newspaper in front of the camera.

April 20th, 2010.

I was 9 years old, it was two days before my 10th birthday, the first birthday he would miss and the last one he would attend.

“Scott, it’s April 25th, 2010 and if you’re watching this video I’m most likely dead.”

“I’m sorry I haven’t been there for you but I can’t keep quiet about what TCAP is doing any longer because they are changing history and most people in 2010 don’t know how much history has changed already.”

“Please take my journal and the brass key to Joe Robertson at Willows High School, he will know what to do with them.”

In the middle of the video, a 9-year-old me burst Into the living room wearing a Superman tee shirt, my dad hugged me and then looked into the camera.

“Son, I’m begging you, please don’t try and travel back in time. By the time you get my package there’s no knowing what life will be like when you’ve grown up.”

To be continued….

Jeremy Raglin
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