Image for post
Image for post
Photo from Flickr, Terry M

“Thats morbid,” everyone responded when I tell them I’ve been reading the New York Times collection of obituaries. I disagree. I read an obituary a day to test a practice I read about from Austin Kleon from his book, “Show Your Work.” Mr. Kleon states it simulates the feeling about being hit with a life altering event. My expectation was I would be grounded in the reality, being reminded of my inevitable death if I read them. This is to simulate the feeling that you know your end will come some day without having to go through a life altering…


I’ve found the answer I’ve been looking for. I already found the answer years ago, but I’ve got to dig it up every now and again. The question: What’s the meaning of life? The answer: It’s different for everyone, so you’ve got to figure it out. This time, I’m revisiting it in a different context. I’m reading “Not Fade Away: A Short Life Well Lived” by Peter Barton & Laurence Shames and I’ve been tying it with conversations I’ve had with my roommates about a recent death of a former co-worker. In “Not Fade Away”, Peter, who had terminal cancer…


I wrote two separate pieces that I thought would become this week’s letter, but I scrapped them before I was finished. Each of these pieces devolved into a rant about what was going wrong with a painful decision point I had at the beginning of the week. This frustration became my creative rut. It’s a series of second guesses given by a very harsh, inner voice.

I started writing the first paragraph of the first draft, and really hated it. I deleted the paragraph and started over, but the writing sounded worse. The thing I’ve come to compromise about longer…


What are you afraid of? Are there things in your life that are blocking you from doing what you want to do?

I had a profound thought to myself this past weekend while watching the new Avengers movie. There were a series of scenes in which the superheroes were shown what they were most afraid of. In the middle of watching this, I had an nasty thought that came back, one that should’ve been settled years ago. …


There’s importance in boredom and letting your mind wander.

Kids and Boredom

The other day, during dinner with my friend Jon, we were discussing what is the most negative thing brought about by technology today. Hands down, I said the use of technology in conditioning our children to form bad habits. Coincidentally, after dinner, we were walking to the car and saw a mother and a child. The child, maybe 5 years old, was whining and crying in public. The mother reached into her bag, pulled out an iPad, and gave it to her child. Immediately, he shut up and was mesmerized by…


With an ending comes a new beginning. It is up to us to determine whether we are going to make it into a good beginning, or a bad one.

When Tech TV went bankrupt in 2004, Leo Laporte and the crew of the cable network were out of jobs. Some were offered to work for G4TV, who took over Tech TV’s assets, while others were laid off. This team had immense creative control over the content of the channel and didn’t try to dumb down the content for their audience. Leo Laporte was the host of…


On the old encryption techniques, how to decrypt them, and an exploration of “The Intimidation Game”, exploring Engima and finding differences between real events and the film.

Monoalphabetic Cipher

I’ve been fascinated by cryptography ever since I was a kid. I remember briefly when my parents got a free subscription to the SF Chronicle and skipping straight to the comics and puzzles. One puzzle in particular, the cryptogram puzzles, got me to take my pen out and try to decode the message. It’s a simple monoalphabetic cipher where one letter maps to another letter, but the letter can never map to itself.

The simplest monoalphabetic cipher is called a Caesar Cipher, where you simply shift the alphabet by a certain amount. If…


Image for post
Image for post
Flickr: Originally uploaded by sylvar, Creative Commons

We shouldn’t be using weight as a metric for healthiness. Weight measures primarily subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, water and muscle weight (yes, we’re composed of more things). The weight value can not tell the composition make-up of that person. For example, someone could have a large build, but sound overweight according to their BMI, yet just have most of their weight in muscle. Or, someone could be petite, yet have a lot of visceral fat. There’s no inherent evil in any single factor. …


On the importance and power of names

I read this delightful children’s book called “Lauren Ipsum” by Carlos Bueno and Ytaelena López about a girl named Lauren who journeys through Userland trying to find her way back home. It utilizes Computer Science topics weaved into Lauren’s story. One of the delightful characters she meets is Eponymous Bach, a woman who composes ideas and puts her name on them. “Eponymous” is an actual word that means giving a name to things. For a name to be eponymous, it must use someone’s name…


On International Women’s Day, my former hack-mate from Science Hack Day tweeted out female scientists that are inspiring to her. You can read her full article here. In that spirit, I wanted to talk about meeting someone who inspired me.

Ze Frank

Ze Frank is an Internet sensation primarily known for his Internet show back in 2006 entitled “The Show”. In 2012, he released a new show with the help of Kickstarter backers called “A Show”. …

Jeremy Wong

Software Engineer, Marathoner, Novice Baker, Reader and Writer. Check out my newsletter http://tinyletter.com/jeremywong

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store