Fairly or unfairly, and I can’t say I care, I just went ahead and blocked the lady after she…
Ron Collins
11

Eloquently stated, Ron, as is always your style. NCFM.org, a men’s and father’s group, could certainly benefit from your views.

I have long been bothered by society’s and the courts’ resistance to integrate men into the world of children to the degree women are integrated into the world of work.

Here’s a view I believe has been missing for 40 years in all the tens of thousands of reports about women and work:

Society consists of two “worlds”: the world of work (the productive world), and the world of children (the reproductive world). Obviously each world needs the other for its survival, so the two worlds are equally important to civilization’s survival.

Despite this equal importance, what do you suppose is the result thus far of the 50-year-old push for “gender equality”? It seems to be this:

⦁ We are ending men’s dominance in the world of work; the Economist at http://www.economist.com/node/15174489 “says, “[W]omen are gradually taking over the workplace.”

⦁ Largely because “women give birth, are better nurturers, etc.,” we are preserving women’s dominance in the world of children. (Men have no reproductive rights except the right not to participate in sex. Imagine if women had no rights in the productive world except the right not to participate.)

Too many feminist groups refuse to believe that men face as much sexism and discrimination in the world of children as do women in the world of work. They also don’t see that the forces preventing men from being fully integrated into the world of children are the same forces that prevent women from being fully integrated into the world of work.

Thus they don’t realize this: There will never be full equality in the world of work for women so long as there is not full equality in the world of children for men. “…[A]pparently women really are ‘the boss’ at home. That’s according to a new study by a team of Iowa State University researchers. http://www.public.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/jun/wifepower.shtml

(If men had demanded equality in the world of children before women demanded equality in the world of work, I would have said the same thing in reverse.)

So how are men treated in the world of children? First, how often do you hear “men and children” vs. the male-exclusionary “women and children”? And how many times have you heard “Take Your Daughter to Work Day,” but never “Take Your Son to the Maternity Ward Day” (or to other female-dominated occupations to help him feel he can be a part of the near-maleless world of children).

Here are other ways men are treated in the world of children:

“In movies, dads not treated as equal to moms” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/in-movies-dads-not-treated-as-equals-to-moms/

“Eek! A Male!” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/eek-a-male/

“Segregating Children From Men” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2012/01/26/segregating-children-from-men/

“My Personal Experiences in Genderland” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/my-personal-experiences-in-gender-land/

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