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The 2020 election has evolved into the most nerve-wracking, bitterly divided event that I, and many others, have ever experienced in our adult lifetime. Add the live stream of voting results on a variety of media sources, and you have a country — reacting play-by-play — to history in the making.

Before the election, I researched every digital news experience I could find to determine which would be best for following along, and it was fairly difficult to narrow it down. …


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Illustrations by Anna Golde from Icons8

At RingCentral, the UX team has a fairly large design system housed in Sketch and shared out via Abstract. Designers and developers reference it, and we actively maintain and evolve it as much as possible.
As thorough as it is, we recently ran into an issue.

Many new Project Managers and Product Owners have asked to view our design system to help understand the brand as it applies to our products. We would send an Abstract link along, but would quickly get feedback that the format was too difficult to navigate and overwhelming with content. …


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It’s no secret that the technology and design industry lacks racial and gender diversity. This is especially true when we look at statistics around black and female representation in graphic design and software development roles. Black individuals make up 3% of graphic designers and 4.3% of computer programmers. Women of all races make up less than 1/4th of computer programmers in the US — a statistic that has definitely improved over the years, but is still quite low.

There are many reasons for this, but Anthony D. …


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In a popular children’s show called, “Max and Ruby”, two bunny siblings encounter everyday challenges together in the most annoyingly wholesome ways. What I found interesting about the show is that Max and Ruby’s parents are never mentioned or seen throughout the entire series. I instantly thought, oh no… are their parents completely out of the picture leaving a pre-teen sister to care for her toddler brother? It looks like they inherited the house and are somehow gathering food successfully, so that’s good? But also — how devastating!

Then I decided to google it.

The creator of Max and Ruby, Rosemary Wells, said in an interview that she intentionally leaves the parents out of the show because children tend to solve problems in different ways when adults are not around. Unique solutions develop when little minds interpret problems vs. being guided by adults who solve the same ol’ problems in the same ol’ ways. …

About

Jessica Adamson

Senior Product Designer @ RingCentral // linkedin.com/in/aisforadamson

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