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Spring time is here in SF!

Each quarter I come up with three goals to obtain. Sometimes I hit those goals and other times I may not. Sometimes other accomplishments that I didn’t really account for appear. For example, I didn’t set a goal for reading books but I did read one and I thought that would be interesting to note. Just in case you are interested in my goal tracking tools, I use the Best Self Journal and I highly recommend it.

First off, below are my accomplishments for Q1 2018:

Q1 2018 — Accomplishments


Below is a Q&A session to answer some common questions about testing. Some of these insights come from my book, Testing Angular Applications, and some from my professional experience.

What testing tools and/or workflow do you use?

I do a lot of testing for Angular applications. I use Karma for unit testing, Protractor for End-to-End testing, and the Angular-CLI for setting up, configuring and installing testing tools.

Setting up an environment for testing is a snap if you use the Angular-CLI. In the past, setting up your testing environment could be challenging and time-consuming. Now it can be done in a matter of minutes.

Once a project is set up with the Angular-CLI there are tons of handy commands that you can execute. Generating code-coverage reports, changing browsers to test against, watching for code changes so that tests automatically run and much more are available at your fingertips right out of the box. …


TLDR: Even though the book is aimed at kids, as the title infers, I would recommend JavaScript for Kids to anyone who wants an introduction to JavaScript. It is well written, easy read that is engaging while educational.

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Image cover courtesy of No Starch Press

I saw this book a couple years ago and I’ve always wanted to read it. The illustrations and example seemed so well done, I could help be but be somewhat curious. I can say with 100% honesty, I was not disappointed. This is a well written introduction to JavaScript. …


I’m going to be spending a fair amount of time in the next couple of weeks traveling and I thought that it would be nice to do a little light reading while I was traveling. My goal was to select 5 solid, software engineering books to read while I was traveling.

In order to pick out the best books that I used the following criteria:

  • The book must be a software engineering book that focuses on people, processes, soft skills, practices, or management. I won’t have the ability to type out code while traveling, so I’m skipping any coding books. We will also rule out books on heavy concepts like algorithms, computability, and advance mathematics. …

About

Jesse Palmer

Senior Engineering Manager, Growth @ SurveyMonkey

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