Day 2

1st and foremost NO THATS NOT MY DAD! So lets pick up where we left off, I decided to stay in Seattle and take care of my dad. So while I was in the hospital the first few days it really I took an emotional beating. I had never observed someone I knew personally in that type of condition let alone my own father. I had to spoon feed him just to get him to eat, but a few days in something amazing happened, my dad recognized that I was at the hospital with him and his mental state was instantly invigorated. He started having conversations with me about any and everything, what was going on in the hospital (he would poke fun at some of the vets and staff) where we were going to eat when he was discharged, how we would catch up on Love and Hip Hop episodes (my pops said @joebudden was the 🐑 G.O.A.T), and that he wanted to buy a house. So about a week passed and his spirits were high and health was much better so they discharged him from the VA (I will let you know my thoughts on how the VA shits on vets in a later entry- that is just my way of saying they could do a great deal to improve the type of care and treatment they provide vets) and we went back to the house he had been in for the last 10 years. It was a small spot in Seattle, big enough for him and his belongings. Upon arriving at the house and just going through the living room and the kitchen I noticed my dad liked to keep things. Literally- he would not toss anything, and he was organized- had letters in file cabinets, documents in other cabinets, photos from years ago (which is always a great thing to keep), books from the stone age (my pops read a great deal in his earlier years), all types of awards and recognition from the State of Washington- Governor Booth Gardner, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Washington State department of Higher Education. He graduated from the UW with a Masters in social work and went on to work for the state. So his degrees were in a box along with a ton of other documents and once I glanced into the living and notice the table full of prescription pill bottles, my father was taking 8–12 types of meds every day-2 to 3 times a day. It is wild how someone will get prescribe tons of medications- like there has to be a different way of assisting people with their physical and mental health… oh I forgot - the pharmaceutical industry has to get their pockets LINED UP. Well, I noticed my father diet consisted of nothing that he cooked himself. All he had was cereal and pre packaged meals that he had delivered and he would microwave. I immediately tossed em all went grocery shopping and started cooking 3 meals a day for him. Hilarious when I was headed out to the grocery store that first time he asked me to get him a 6 pack of Sprite and 3 Twix bars I couldn’t do anything but LOL at that. He said, “whatever you do just keep me tight with Sprite and Twix.” Being back and Seattle and with my dad allowed us to get to know each other again, I mean I literally spent 24 hours a day around him so we had a lot of time to talk. My dad had some had some health conditions that he has been dealing with that I was aware of but never took the time to really understand them, multiple myeloma (cancerous cells that weaken bones) had been inside of my father for the past 10 years. It was inactive but in his system is what he told me. He dealt with tinnitus (ringing or buzzing of the ears), I remember him telling me that the ringing was constant 24–7. I tried to do what I could do to help but as folks get older they get stubborn and sometimes they get so discouraged with how things have been that they will not take measures to change what is currently going on in their life.

This has been semi boring writing this entry but like I said to myself I am going to write something everyday, tomorrow I will have a funny story to tell… people who know me will tell you that I drink socially and DO NOT engage in drug usage but there was this one time me and my dad… TO BE CONTINUED tomm 😎

-@jessepeakdotcom

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