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On a Lighter TalpiNote

SeventyPoundsOfSem

by Helena Lustig

@seventypoundsofsem’s Green instragram

I’ve been feeling a little under the weather lately, so I decided to go to the doctor at Wolfson Medical Center. A trip to the doctor is no fun, but lucky for me I was treated by only the best, that is, after I left. On my way back, I stopped in a small shop a little up the block, called ‘Green — Good Food’. This mini health café is home to a taste of, well, home. The cramped restaurant is filled with bagels, salad, muffins, soups, coffee, and other life staples. One of the things I decided to order was an iced caramel latte, ’cause hey, where else are you going to find that in Israel? I’ll just say that even though it’s no Starbucks (as sadly nothing is in Israel), it’s a good substitute.

Aside from their stellar coffee, at Green they make sure you get what you pay for. The muffins came out of the kitchen steaming before my eyes, and they pack their salads in with whatever the bowl can hold, and then add some more.

Though it’s a little out of the way, it’s just a short walk from my bus line into town, so I can confidently say I can be found there in the near future.

Students of MidLind: Meet Rachel Nordlicht

by Nathalie Kahn

Rachel Nordlicht (“Nordi”)

What did you eat for lunch today, and was it satisfying?

Aviva, my roommate, cooked me vegetable stir fry. It was very satisfying.

Where are you from? Do you feel that sets you apart from all the other girls here?

I am from New Rochelle, and I do not feel that sets me apart from the other girls here.

Do you feel this is similar to your high school?

Sometimes. I am treated more like an adult here — it depends on the situation.

What is something unique about you?

My family moved here for the year with me, and I have red hair.

What are you doing next year? Are you excited? Why do you feel that place is a good fit for you?

I am going to Barnard. I am a bit excited, but I wish I could stay and serve my country.

What is your favorite activity to do outside of school?

Play football and go out to eat. And be in my bed [at my house].

Do you feel you have had any religious epiphanies since you have arrived at Midreshet Lindenbaum?

Yeah. I feel more connected to kashrut.

MidLind Obstacle: The Not So Little Things

by Yael Beirig

I’ve written in the past about the obstacles we face being newly independent women, like laundry, cleaning and mice extermination. However, there are smaller daily decisions that become obstacles once you’re on your own. Decisions, by definition, need consideration, but we’re used to considering possibilities at home, with our parents or siblings. Now, it’s just you and your brain.

In Israel, every decision seems like a bigger deal than it would at home. Do I really want to eat school lunch and be meat the rest of the day? Should I shower tonight or after I work out tomorrow (will I work out tomorrow…)? Lunch: nap or Netflix? Should I go out to dinner with my school friend or camp friends? Do I bus or cab to that dinner? Should I really eat that second donut?

I think you get the point. We seminary girls are faced with loads of decisions that — to us — are big deals and can change our days. Some of you parents have heard these questions, because we sometimes are so lost that we call for your guidance. Thank God for the time difference, because you guys only hear about our problems starting at around 1:30 pm our time — depending on when you wake up. Anyways, being alone magnifies every small detail.

However, being at Midreshet Lindenbaum helps us to feel a lot less lost about these difficult daily decisions. The madrichot are always ready to hear out our options and guide us with knowledge and experience. When you don’t know whether or not shampoo should be that expensive, they’ve got your back. And then often for more significant decisions or questions, we have our wonderful teachers here to help. What Sefer should I learn during night Seder? And of course — should I make Aliyah?

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