I don’t know what to do
Heather Nann
466

A suggestion that may or may not fit…

Find a focal object. A candle works, or a fireplace. (I use one on my computer screen because: techno geek.) Put on some light music, preferably instrumental but whatever works for you (something to occupy your ears but not your mind). Get a watch with a second hand.

Sit. Put the watch next to you so that it is out of your immediate line of sight but you can read it at a glance. Stare at your focal object while practicing your breathing techniques from therapy (they still teach that stuff, yes?). Get your heart rate down.

Focus on The Question.

Okay, fine, you have a lot of questions. Whatever. One of them is The Question. If you can’t figure out The Question, write down all of them in no particular order, then cross out the least important one. If you can’t determine the least of several, compare the last two and cross out the lesser of two. Than again. Then again.

Focus on The Question.

Don’t worry about the answer. You won’t find the answer. You have the answer, you just misplaced it. Don’t worry about the answer. Just open yourself to possibility and truth.

Focus on The Question.

When you are ready, while The Question is in your mind, look at the watch. Look at the second hand and where it points. Now look in that direction.

What is the first thing you see?

How does that relate to The Question?

Meditate on it.

Okay, yes, this can produce non-intuitive results. Like, the first thing you see is a can of chickpeas. So, a can of chickpeas is supposed help me with my question? Maybe. Why do you have a can of chickpeas? Why do you have a can of chickpeas in your bedroom? And in what ways does that relate to The Question?

By the way, this technique also works on hiccups.

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