It’s now 3 years after the sabbatical and re-entry to workforce, and it continues to be vocationally the best thing I’ve ever done.

I was wide open upon return. Legs strong, synapses cleared, and ready for my first female President and a new professional start.

We all know that one of those things did not happen, and a very real part of my autumnal return was that I became depressed for months after the U.S. Election. It put lead in my shoes and stopped me in my tracks in a way I can’t deny this narrative.

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Hiking the coastal path recently in Cornwall, England. The only way over is through.

By early spring, I…


Since I heard the classic Simon & Garfunkel lyric when I was little, I have dreamed of my bowtie being a camera. And today, that dream came true.

I’ve written a few articles on here about street photography… primarily the social and interpersonal, and even spiritual, aspects of it. The process, the meditative nature, the risk of offense, and the opportunity for connection. I think about this a lot. But… what if you removed all of that?

Laughing on the bus Playing games with the faces She said the man in the gabardine suit was a spy I said “Be…


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Part two of a 3-part series, after How to Sabbatical, Pt. 1: Jump Off the Train, and coming soon How to Sabbatical, Pt. 3: Re-Entry.

This is one of the best things I’ve ever done in life, spiritually and professionally.

Preparing for the trip was equal parts overwhelm and sheer joy. I had the start and end points — from Iceland vacation in August with my girlfriend, to returning home from Japan before the U.S. election in November. When I left home what I’d booked was exactly this: One-way ticket to Iceland, Iceland to Norway, train through Norway, Oslo to…


Designing the future of tech using the HAPI emotional model

Transcript from my lightning talk at Conflux: Future Possible (Amazon design conference) 9/21/2017 and Tokyo Design Forum 10/12/2017.

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Maybe like you, I’ve been asked to design “magical” experiences. I’ve worked on early-stage voice shopping, predictive carts, and now physical stores like Amazon Go.


Last summer I did one of the scariest things I’ve ever done: I quit my job to restore my health, live my dreams, and find my way to my next professional life.

Spoiler alert: It worked.

I figured out how to do it and got the courage and inspiration to do it from others’ stories, so I’m writing this in the spirit of paying that forward to you.

Jumping off the train

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My identity, in more ways than one. (And yes, that is Comic Sans.)

I do not take employment or financial security for granted. I come from a refugee family, and as an adult have myself lost everything twice — in a recession and from a…


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Street photography is an addictive calling — the more you do it, the more you want to do it — you crave more people, more places, more action. And it’s one of the most dynamic and exciting types of photography to share on social media, with an active community around the world. Here are some quick tips to take your street shooting and editing to the next level.

Taking the shot

1. Get to know your light.


Story of the Street street photography collective asked me to guest host their account for the week of October 1, 2016. This series was originally published on their Instagram account. More of my Japan street photography can be found at instagram.com/jillcorral.

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Day 1

Day 1

Hello and welcome to Japan! I’m @jillcorral and thrilled to bring you to Tokyo with me this week. I’ve been traveling for a few months capturing street life around the world.

In a city that pulses 24 hours a day with millions of flashing colors, why capture it in black and white? Because Tokyo truly comes alive…


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“Being a man [street photographer] is way harder. People will think that you are a creep if you take photos of children and women.” — reader comment on my last article on public privacy

I’m 5 feet tall on a good day. People always ask me for directions and children look me in the eye. I’m low-profile and not threatening and, with my black clothes and small camera, I easily disappear into city crowds. Being a women makes me vulnerable on the street, but is an advantage as a photographer.

On the flip side, when photo subjects do notice me…


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Street Photography and Public Privacy

“Hey, don’t take our picture!” a young woman yelled out from her group to me a few days ago. I told her I didn’t take their photo — and it was true, I was just facing them playing Pokémon Go on my phone as many others were also doing in the park that day. But, often I am doing just that.

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” — Robert Capa

As an active street photographer and generally a private person myself, the question of what is a fair subject for my lens is constantly on my…


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The Zen of Street Photography for Everybody

Every stock photo for “meditation” looks exactly the same: A 30-something white woman sitting in lotus position with her thumb and forefinger looped in a mudra, hands resting on her knees with her eyes closed. (Bonus points if she’s sitting on a beach or mountaintop.)

Sitting there like that does nothing for me. Apart from disappearing into the liquid oneness of a pulsing dancefloor or the waves of an ocean, there is no greater flow for me than to lose myself in a sea of urban humanity with my camera in hand.

The word Zen is derived from the Chinese…

Jill Corral

Photographer and Sr. UX/Voice Design Lead for Alexa AI at Amazon. Find me at jill.design.

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