One finding: Financial issues aren’t typically the top concern.

In the world as we’ve known it, growing older has meant entering into a period of reflection. The horizon shortens, the experiences of loss multiply, and salient questions rise to the surface: How are you going to live your life in a way that matters? What will be different about the world because you were in it?

Understanding the mindset of older customers and how it impacts their behavior is vital for life insurance advisors, who will likely support the continuation of legacies that took a lifetime to build.

These findings come from a February 2020 white paper, “Aging is…


The evolution of a senior with a purposeful goal that matters.

Since elderly people may walk with a cane or appear frail, they’re often treated more like children than full-fledged adults. Younger folks jump at the chance to help, often doing things for them whether they like it or not. Though at times help might be warranted, it’s often based on perception rather than necessity, and that perception can rob older people of their independence. It also neglects a crucial aspect of healthy aging: a sense of purpose.

To thrive at any age, life needs to feel vibrant, and that means purpose should take center stage. …


While older adults have bristled at the term ‘senior’ for decades, no one is less interested in adopting the moniker than aging Baby Boomers. In fact, because they comprise such a varied demographic, Baby Boomers are opening the aperture on what it means to be in later adulthood. And later adulthood itself has undergone a sea change — advancements in technology and healthcare have led to increased longevity — what I call the New Life Curve .

As Joseph Coughlin, founder and director of the MIT AgeLab, has said, “Over the past century, we’ve created the greatest gift in the…


A misguided assumption women sometimes have about mentors is that they should support you at every turn. I get it: We all want to “dwell where we excel, “and many of us are nurturing by nature. But as a result, we may end up with that great potential we have being held back by the societal distinctions made between men and women.

In response, I say, figure out where you’re weakest and then find a safe way to work through your weaknesses.

Some questions to ask yourself here are: How comfortable are you presenting to a team of male counterparts…


Telemedicine has been in use for at least a century — when a bladder surgery was guided via morse code in rural Australia by the founder of what later became known as the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

With widespread broadband adoption in the developed world, telemedicine has evolved as the future of healthcare. Why? It’s incredibly convenient — for both doctor and patient — the costs are often reduced, and it brings primary care physicians to places that would otherwise go without. …


An interview with Clive Thompson, author of Coders.

In high school, I was the only girl in the robotics club. We were trying to do what code does — take parts of your life and automate them, so you can free up your time. And I was really interested in learning how these things worked. We would take them apart, troubleshoot, rebuild and repeat. Our big moment was getting a robot to sweep the floor (not very well, mind you). But I never took to writing code itself, which made reading Clive Thompson’s Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, all the…


My interest in neuroplasticity was piqued last month when I attended an all-day workshop hosted by Thrive, Arianna Huffington’s latest venture. It’s pretty extraordinary that after a century of scientists telling us that the adult brain does not grow, we are stepping into a whole new paradigm — moving from the belief that the brain is fixed for life to the possibility for growth or restructuring. Some people bounce back from brain trauma. Some blind people find new ways to “see.” There are no guarantees and no miracle cures, but there is a chance things could change.

Recent research out…


When I first heard about Karen Wickre, I was amazed. Her bio, in shorthand, is this: Google at 51 and Twitter at 60. How many people break into Silicon Valley’s most coveted spots after the age of 30? Not too many. According to this study Baby Boomers are 60% less likely to be hired in Silicon Valley, and ageism is so prevalent that Intel is being investigated by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. My takeaway from Wickre’s impressive bio was that she must be an excellent networker. …


Consider this scenario: An employee of yours is reaching 65. They have been with the company for decades. You could always count on them through thick and thin, and now they’re going to walk out the door, because as far as they know, that’s the only option they have.

This situation is quite common, but it’s more damaging to organizations than you might think. If you were to do some high-level accounting of assets, you would see that you lose much of your value and institutional intellectual property when your employees retire.

It doesn’t have to be this way. In…


If you look up the top ten female innovators, how likely is it that you’ll recognize their names? Marie Curie, sure. Perhaps Shirley Jackson. And maybe you know about Rosalind Franklin, whose work showed that DNA was in fact arranged in a double helix. But Grace Hopper, who is responsible for computer programming? Or Ann Tsukamoto, who first isolated stem cells in 1991? I’m not trying to point fingers. I didn’t know most of the names, and I’ve been innovating for my entire career.

What wows me is that these women pursued their interests and curiosity, knowing, in all likelihood…

Jeannette McClennan

President of The McClennan Group, Serial Entrepreneur, Digital Businesses, Co-Author Innovators Anonymous, #IA

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