A look into obsessive-compulsive symmetry and its plague on usability.

Death the Kid in front of a symmetrical user interface
Death the Kid in front of a symmetrical user interface
Even his weapons and attacks are symmetrical.

In the popular anime series, Soul Eater, Death the Kid is a Shinigami (Japanese death god) who vanquishes evil with his dual pistols, Liz and Patty. Although he’s strikingly powerful, his battles are often hindered by his obsessive-compulsive need for symmetry; Kid is unable to hurt perfectly symmetrical enemies, unable to focus on a chase when passing beautiful symmetrical objects, and is paralyzed in disgust by the sight of extreme asymmetry.

This obsessive-compulsive tendency actually exists in all of us. Something in our brain tells us “Symmetry is good and we must always strive for it!”

Throughout my work as…


A journey into a user experience design career

An illustrated landscape from Shenzhen to SF to Boston
An illustrated landscape from Shenzhen to SF to Boston

EPISODE I: The Woke Youth

The Tiananmen Square massacre.
The fall of the Berlin Wall.
The birth of J. K. Wong.
These historic moments mark the end and beginning of eras.

Quincy, Massachusetts — A newborn J. K. Wong arrives at his new home clutching the pencil that the doctor used to test his palmar reflex. As he develops, he never lets go, sketching everything in his head: from imaginary friends to cartoon space operas. This obsession consumes him.

1996 — The young J. K. receives his first Gameboy Pocket, introducing him to the digital world. …

J. K. Wong

is a UX designer (jkwong.design) and musician (facebook.com/aznjujube) with a psych background. Follow his IG (instagram.com/aznjujube) for more info!

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