How to use Markdown

Markdown is a very nice way to transform simple text to formatted text (HTML). If you’re working in a tech company or have started to use Ghost, you’re likely to be confronted with it.

Here’s a guide to quickly get started.

Paragraphs

Markdown does not want to force you to put long paragraphs on a single line. That is unfriendly for text editors. That’s why you need two line breaks to split a single paragraph in markdown.

This is text in markdown.
This is more text in markdown.

The text above becomes:

This is text in markdown. This is more text in markdown.

Headers

To make a line of text a big header, prefix it with a single #. Use more for incrementally smaller headers.

# This will be transformed into a big header
## This will be transformed into a big, yet slightly smaller header
### etc

Links

A link consists of two parts. The part that you see, the link text, and the actual link, the URL. To make one in markdown, do this:

[This link goes to Google](https://www.google.com)

The line above becomes: This link goes to Google

Pictures

Pictures are basically links to images that you tell the browser you want to display immediately. That’s why the syntax of images in Markdown is very similar to links:

![This is the text you see when you hover over this image (called the ‘Alt text’)](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b7/Cosmo_Kramer.jpg)

Becomes:

Note that I’m not able to set the text you see when you hover over the image in Medium.

Lists

Use ‘*’ or ‘-’ for lists without numbers. Use ‘1.’ for numbered lists.

1. one
1. two
1. three

becomes:

  1. one
  2. two
  3. three
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