Photo by Katie Smith on Unsplash

There are many ways to store data in programming, one of them is known as a hash table. Javascript has its own variations of hashing, like the new Map functionality that was introduced with ECMAScript 2015 or ES6, which creates an associative array and remembers the insertion order. In a hash table, as opposed to a typical array, however, the keys are put through a hashing function, and then a numerical value is assigned to the data, and it’s placed in that location in the table, set inside what’s called a bucket. The bucket that it is inserted into can…


More on the doubly linked list — looking at nodes

Welcome to part two of Doubling Down on Linked Lists. If you want to read part one, you can do so here: Doubling Down on Linked List pt. 1. In this part we’ll go over a few more methods of a doubly linked list, such as getting a particular node, setting a nodes value, and inserting a new node. These methods are a little bit more complicated and lengthy than those covered in part one but fear not, it’s all just data and you’re the masters of data!

Binary Flowing down screen. Gif made by xponentialdesign

The first method we’re…


What’s a doubly linked list, and how do you create one?

Metro North at the Botanical Gardens platform in Bronx, New York

You may be wondering why I chose to preface this article with a picture of a Metro North train—and if you live in New York, you may even be hating me for reminding you of the reason you’re always late. Doubly linked lists have many of the same characteristics as a train, however, and that’s how I’d like you to visualize them as we roll through a couple of methods.

So, how is it that a data structure resembles a train? …


Sorting algorithms are something you hear quite a bit about. Especially when you’re talking about a major company, perhaps one of the FAANG companies. Graduating from a coding bootcamp, I realized I lacked something integral to help me get through the rounds of interviews that were soon to come. I was missing the ability to rack my brain for various cases in which the algorithms I had yet to learn could be incorporated. While taking courses on algorithms and data structures, I thought it might be helpful to others experiencing trepidation, to read through line by line what’s happening and…


Have you ever written a functional component, and then realized, this would be a lot easier if I had the ability to change state on one or two things? Well guess what, no more changing your functional component into a class! What a beautiful world we live in. I write about React on valentines day, because me and React are in a love hate relationship. One of the things I hated about it was if I wanted to render a form I had to pass props down from the App to a component that renders another component that has a…


It’s difficult to get a grasp on code sometimes. One of the most frequent sayings we hear as programmers is, “sometimes it’s best to just walk away from the code for a bit.” So incredibly true, insanely hard to do. I think about the problems that my code presents me sometimes for hours on end no matter what activity I’m engaged in. At times it seems like I’m paying the closest attention imaginable to something being said but in my mind I’m off trying to figure out why my function is returning undefined. This is a terrible way to go…


Synesthesia is a strange phenomena. Synesthesia is defined as the production of a sense impression relating to one sense or part of the body by stimulation of another sense or part of the body. So maybe when you read a word, the word may produce a color if your a synesthete, this particular variation is called Grapheme-color synesthesia. When somebody with Grapheme-color synesthesia sees an equation or reads a line of a book and the colors emerge as if a rainbow would appear before their very eyes, or the flavors or nutmeg turns to into a bright orange.

Photo Credit goes to — Bruno Fazzolari

Synesthesia comes…


Ruby is wonderful, it’s frustrating, but most of all it’s very human-like in its syntax. I was introduced to Javascript many years ago, long before the invention of ES6 on a website called codeacademy, and the first thing it taught was a simple for loop. I’ve always had an attachment to the for loop, mostly because it made me feel like I was doing something awesome and simultaneously showed me that I could comprehend something so abstract, such as var i = 0. Javascript quickly exposed all of it’s quirks and before naught I had no idea what I was…

Joe Lorenzo

Car lover, hiker, full-stack engineer, who loves the thrill of climbing a mountain or writing well thought out code.

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