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Photo by AJ Colores on Unsplash

It’s difficult to imagine that behemoth companies like Facebook and Google were once humble startups. Jeff Bezos started Amazon in his garage at the age of 30. Today, he’s the world’s richest man, with Amazon accounting for nearly 50% of all online sales in the US in 2018, and reporting a market capitalisation of $755.7 billion at the beginning of 2019.

We’re often told that companies are here to change the way we live for the better. Facebook has sold itself as being the world’s social network, connecting billions of people around the globe, and has even set its sights on launching its own digital currency, Libra, which could theoretically bring financial infrastructure to those in the developing world who have no access to banks. …


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The process of startups taking software from concept to rollout is far from straightforward. Coming up with a dynamite idea for a product is one thing. Agreeing on how to build, maintain and scale it is quite another, and can often devolve into a development team at loggerheads with each other and the CTO.

Constructing the architecture of an application traditionally draws people into one of two camps, which is often where these disagreements stem from. For some, the more traditional concept of a unified, centralised software framework is the ideal situation, such as those utilised by tech companies like Uber in their early stages. …


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As society becomes increasingly data driven, the importance of ensuring this data’s security and fidelity grows exponentially. While prevention is still the best medicine though, tracking down those who have already entered your system is also vital. This has led to the growth of digital forensics — a field of cybersecurity focused on tracking down those who have hijacked the internet for their own nefarious ends.

Television shows such as CSI and NCIS have long presented a stylised version of digital forensics teams, doing battle with mysterious hackers who bombard their screens with flashing red skull-and-crossbones graphics and other such clichés. …


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Bitcoin has surged past the $11,000 mark, successfully navigating the choppy waters thrown up by Donald Trump’s recent stinging tweet attack on Facebook’s proposed Libra coin and all other cryptocurrencies. The President doesn’t like these digital assets, saying that they are ‘not money’, that they facilitate illegal activity, and that they need to be regulated. If such damning words from the Commander in Chief were designed to halt Bitcoin in its tracks, they haven’t worked in the short term.

No matter what your opinions are on Trump, his words (and outbursts) have enormous power to sway popular opinion and market direction. Bitcoin’s resilience to these recent headlines is acting as validation to many who are looking to the future for the currency, including its potential uses in the more traditional financial structure of salary payments to employees. …


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Buy low. Sell high. That’s the underlying goal for any kind of investment, but navigating the financial markets is far more complex than this and involves a great deal of volatility. The big firms dealing with hedge funds and multi-billion dollar portfolios are always looking for new ways to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to analysing market trends and developing strategies that will see reliable returns for their clients.

This is exactly why machine learning has attracted so much attention and investment in the financial trading world. Firms including JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley have become embroiled in a high-tech arms race in recent years, pouring billions of dollars into incorporating machine learning platforms into their infrastructures and hiring developers and researchers into dedicated data science equity teams. …


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True intelligence is subjective. As machine learning progresses, we are witnessing AI programs capable of calculation, data recognition and broader analysis far beyond what humans are capable of. One aspect of intelligence that AI has been lacking, however, is true imagination. But is this for the best?

The potential for algorithmically-generated imagination has long been possible, but it has taken the implementation of a new direction of neural network interplay to be realised. …


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Everyone wants to come up with the next big thing. If you’re lucky enough to succeed in this, you’re soon faced with an uncomfortable realisation — everyone will want to steal your idea. This is the nature of innovation and commerce. It’s often said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Those who have seen their hard work and personal vision pilfered by others may not quite agree with this sentiment, however.

Patents offer a safeguard for intellectual property against potential infringement of every level. In the world of tech, patents are big business. Speculative articles concerning new features in the yearly iPhone refresh cycle are fuelled by new patents filed by Apple, with commentators publishing vague blueprints obtained from the patent office’s public records, and deducing that the next handset will invariably see some incorporation of these often vaguely-worded concepts. …


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If you’re reading this on your phone, what make and model are you using? If it’s any leading smartphone from the last couple of years, more likely than not you’re making use of FaceID to unlock the screen, and it’s a pretty seamless experience.


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Photo by Karine Germain on Unsplash

Everyone wants a piece of the AI gravy train, and the marketing industry is no exception. Studies have shown that 80% of enterprise-level organisations have integrated AI in some form into their business, with 32% of these being marketing companies.

The concept of AI is an appealing one for marketers — identifying customers using their previous purchases to create a smart profile of an individual is something that has already been portrayed in science fiction. …


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Trade shows and expos have historically been crucial calendar events for businesses of all sizes. They are a great opportunity to showcase your products on a large scale, attract investment, and secure new customers. But are you making full use of them?

Even in an era of online marketing and virtual stores, trade shows and expos still play a vital role across almost every industry, and none more so than tech. …

About

John Murray

Senior Editor at Binary District, focusing on machine learning, AI, quantum computing, cybersecurity, IoT

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